Reproved
Reprove Re*prove" (r?-pr??v"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproved} (-pr??vd"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproving}.] [F. r['e]prouver, OF. reprover, fr. L. reprobare. See {Reprieve}, {Reprobate}, and cf. {Reproof}.] 1. To convince. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

When he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment. --John xvi. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. To disprove; to refute. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Reprove my allegation, if you can. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To chide to the face as blameworthy; to accuse as guilty; to censure. [1913 Webster]

What if thy son [1913 Webster]

Prove disobedient, and, reproved, retort, ``Wherefore didst thou beget me?'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. To express disapprobation of; as, to reprove faults. [1913 Webster]

He neither reproved the ordinance of John, neither plainly condemned the fastings of the other men. --Udall. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To reprehend; chide; rebuke; scold; blame censure.

Usage: {Reprove}, {Rebuke}, {Reprimand}. These words all signufy the expression of disapprobation. To reprove implies greater calmness and self-possession. To rebuke implies a more excited and personal feeling. A reproof may be administered long after the offience is committed, and is usually intended for the reformation of the offender; a rebuke is commonly given at the moment of the wrong, and is administered by way of punishment and condemnation. A reprimand proceeds from a person invested with authority, and is a formal and offiscial act. A child is reproved for his faults, and rebuked for his impudence. A military officer is reprimanded for neglect or violation of duty. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Reproving — Reprove Re*prove (r? pr??v ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproved} ( pr??vd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproving}.] [F. r[ e]prouver, OF. reprover, fr. L. reprobare. See {Reprieve}, {Reprobate}, and cf. {Reproof}.] 1. To convince. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] When… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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