Reprove
Reprove Re*prove" (r?-pr??v"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproved} (-pr??vd"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproving}.] [F. r['e]prouver, OF. reprover, fr. L. reprobare. See {Reprieve}, {Reprobate}, and cf. {Reproof}.] 1. To convince. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

When he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment. --John xvi. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. To disprove; to refute. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Reprove my allegation, if you can. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To chide to the face as blameworthy; to accuse as guilty; to censure. [1913 Webster]

What if thy son [1913 Webster]

Prove disobedient, and, reproved, retort, ``Wherefore didst thou beget me?'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

4. To express disapprobation of; as, to reprove faults. [1913 Webster]

He neither reproved the ordinance of John, neither plainly condemned the fastings of the other men. --Udall. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To reprehend; chide; rebuke; scold; blame censure.

Usage: {Reprove}, {Rebuke}, {Reprimand}. These words all signufy the expression of disapprobation. To reprove implies greater calmness and self-possession. To rebuke implies a more excited and personal feeling. A reproof may be administered long after the offience is committed, and is usually intended for the reformation of the offender; a rebuke is commonly given at the moment of the wrong, and is administered by way of punishment and condemnation. A reprimand proceeds from a person invested with authority, and is a formal and offiscial act. A child is reproved for his faults, and rebuked for his impudence. A military officer is reprimanded for neglect or violation of duty. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • reprove — reprove, rebuke, reprimand, admonish, reproach, chide can all mean to criticize adversely, especially in order to warn of or to correct a fault. To reprove is to blame or censure, often kindly or without harshness and usually in the hope of… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reprove — index admonish (warn), advise, blame, browbeat, castigate, censure, comment, complain ( …   Law dictionary

  • reprove — c.1300, from O.Fr. reprover, from L.L. reprobare disapprove, reject, condemn (see REPROBATE (Cf. reprobate)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • reprove — [v] rebuke admonish, bawl out*, berate, castigate, censure, chew out*, chide, condemn, jump down one’s throat*, lambaste, lay into*, lecture, read the riot act*, reprimand, reproach, scold, take to task*, upbraid; concepts 44,52 …   New thesaurus

  • reprove — ► VERB ▪ rebuke or reprimand. ORIGIN Old French reprover, from late Latin reprobare disapprove …   English terms dictionary

  • reprove — [ri pro͞ov′] vt. reproved, reproving [ME reproven < OFr reprouver < LL(Ec) reprobare: see RE & PROVE] 1. to speak to in disapproval; rebuke 2. to express disapproval of (something done or said); censure 3. Obs. to refute; disprove …   English World dictionary

  • reprove — verb (reproved; reproving) Etymology: Middle English repreven, reproven, from Anglo French reprover, from Late Latin reprobare to disapprove, condemn, from Latin re + probare to test, approve more at prove Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • reprove — reprover, n. reprovingly, adv. /ri proohv /, v., reproved, reproving. v.t. 1. to criticize or correct, esp. gently: to reprove a pupil for making a mistake. 2. to disapprove of strongly; censure: to reprove a bad decision. 3. Obs. to disprove or… …   Universalium

  • reprove — v. (formal) (D; tr.) to reprove for * * * [rɪ pruːv] (formal) (D; tr.) to reprove for …   Combinatory dictionary

  • reprove — UK [rɪˈpruːv] / US [rɪˈpruv] verb [transitive] Word forms reprove : present tense I/you/we/they reprove he/she/it reproves present participle reproving past tense reproved past participle reproved formal to criticize or blame someone for doing… …   English dictionary

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