Reproached
Reproach Re*proach" (r?-pr?ch"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} (-pr?cht"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re- again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near to, throw in one's teeth. Cf. {Approach}.] 1. To come back to, or come home to, as a matter of blame; to bring shame or disgrace upon; to disgrace. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

I thought your marriage fit; else imputation, For that he knew you, might reproach your life. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To attribute blame to; to allege something disgraceful against; to charge with a fault; to censure severely or contemptuously; to upbraid. [1913 Webster]

If ye be reproached for the name of Christ. --1 Peter iv. 14. [1913 Webster]

That this newcomer, Shame, There sit not, and reproach us as unclean. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Mezentius . . . with his ardor warmed His fainting friends, reproached their shameful flight. Repelled the victors. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To upbraid; censure; blame; chide; rebuke; condemn; revile; vilify. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • reproached — index accused (attacked), disreputable Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • reproached — un·reproached; …   English syllables

  • reproached — re·proach || rɪ prəʊtʃ n. reproof, accusation, blame; act of admonishing, act of rebuking; cause for placing blame, cause for admonition v. blame, accuse; reprove, rebuke, admonish; censure, condemn; cause discredit, cause disgrace …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Self-reproached — Self re*proached , a. Reproached by one s own conscience or judgment. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reproach — Re*proach (r? pr?ch ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} ( pr?cht ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near to, throw …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reproaching — Reproach Re*proach (r? pr?ch ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} ( pr?cht ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Napoleon Bonaparte —     Napoleon I (Bonaparte)     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Napoleon I (Bonaparte)     Emperor of the French, second son of Charles Marie Bonaparte and Maria Lætitia Ramolino, b. at Ajaccio, in Corsica, 15 August, 1769; d. on the Island of St.… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • reproach — I UK [rɪˈprəʊtʃ] / US [rɪˈproʊtʃ] verb [transitive] Word forms reproach : present tense I/you/we/they reproach he/she/it reproaches present participle reproaching past tense reproached past participle reproached to criticize someone and feel… …   English dictionary

  • ἐπονειδιστότερον — ἐπονείδιστος to be reproached adverbial comp ἐπονείδιστος to be reproached masc acc comp sg ἐπονείδιστος to be reproached neut nom/voc/acc comp sg …   Greek morphological index (Ελληνική μορφολογικούς δείκτες)

  • Gaullist Party — In France, the Gaullist Party is usually used to refer to the largest party professing to be Gaullist. Gaullism claimed to transcend the left/right rift (in a similar was to populist parties elsewhere such as Fianna Fáil in Ireland). Some… …   Wikipedia

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