Reproach
Reproach Re*proach" (r?-pr?ch"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} (-pr?cht"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re- again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near to, throw in one's teeth. Cf. {Approach}.] 1. To come back to, or come home to, as a matter of blame; to bring shame or disgrace upon; to disgrace. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

I thought your marriage fit; else imputation, For that he knew you, might reproach your life. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To attribute blame to; to allege something disgraceful against; to charge with a fault; to censure severely or contemptuously; to upbraid. [1913 Webster]

If ye be reproached for the name of Christ. --1 Peter iv. 14. [1913 Webster]

That this newcomer, Shame, There sit not, and reproach us as unclean. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Mezentius . . . with his ardor warmed His fainting friends, reproached their shameful flight. Repelled the victors. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To upbraid; censure; blame; chide; rebuke; condemn; revile; vilify. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reproach — Re*proach , n. [F. reproche. See {Reproach}, v.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of reproaching; censure mingled with contempt; contumelious or opprobrious language toward any person; abusive reflections; as, severe reproach. [1913 Webster] No… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reproach — ► VERB 1) express one s disapproval of or disappointment with. 2) (reproach with) accuse of. ► NOUN ▪ an expression of disapproval or disappointment. ● above (or beyond) reproach Cf. ↑beyond reproach …   English terms dictionary

  • reproach — [n] strong criticism; dishonor abuse, admonishment, admonition, blame, blemish, censure, chiding, condemnation, contempt, disapproval, discredit, disgrace, disrepute, ignominy, indignity, obloquy, odium, opprobrium, rap*, rebuke, reprehension,… …   New thesaurus

  • reproach — I noun accusation, animadversion, blame, castigation, censure, chastisement, chiding, complaint, condemnation, contempt, contumelia, contumely, correction, degradation, denouncement, denunciation, derogation, disapprobation, disapproval,… …   Law dictionary

  • reproach — vb chide, admonish, *reprove, rebuke, reprimand Analogous words: *criticize, reprehend, censure, reprobate: *warn, forewarn, caution: counsel, advise (see under ADVICE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reproach — [ri prōch′] vt. [LME reprochen < OFr reprochier < VL * repropiare < L re , back + prope, near] 1. to accuse of and blame for a fault so as to make feel ashamed; rebuke; reprove 2. Rare to bring shame and disgrace upon; be a cause of… …   English World dictionary

  • reproach — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bitter ▪ mild ▪ There was mild reproach in his tone. PREPOSITION ▪ above reproach, beyond …   Collocations dictionary

  • reproach — re|proach1 [rıˈprəutʃ US ˈproutʃ] n formal [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: reproche, from reprochier to reproach , from Vulgar Latin repropiare, from Latin prope near ] 1.) [U] criticism, blame, or disapproval ▪ You don t need me, she… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • reproach — I UK [rɪˈprəʊtʃ] / US [rɪˈproʊtʃ] verb [transitive] Word forms reproach : present tense I/you/we/they reproach he/she/it reproaches present participle reproaching past tense reproached past participle reproached to criticize someone and feel… …   English dictionary

  • reproach — [[t]rɪpro͟ʊtʃ[/t]] reproaches, reproaching, reproached 1) VERB If you reproach someone, you say or show that you are disappointed, upset, or angry because they have done something wrong. [V n] She is quick to reproach anyone who doesn t live up… …   English dictionary

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