Remark
Remark Re*mark" (r?-m?rk"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Remarked} (-m?rkt"); p. pr. & vb. n. {Remarking}.] [F. remarquer; pref. re- re- + marquer to mark, marque a mark, of German origin, akin to E. mark. See {Mark}, v. & n.] 1. To mark in a notable manner; to distinquish clearly; to make noticeable or conspicuous; to piont out. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Thou art a man remarked to taste a mischief. --Ford. [1913 Webster]

His manacles remark him; there he sits. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To take notice of, or to observe, mentally; as, to remark the manner of a speaker. [1913 Webster]

3. To express in words or writing, as observed or noticed; to state; to say; -- often with a substantive clause; as, he remarked that it was time to go. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To observe; notice; heed; regard; note; say.

Usage: {Remark}, {Observe}, {Notice}. To observe is to keep or hold a thing distinctly before the mind. To remark is simply to mark or take note of whatever may come up. To notice implies still less continuity of attention. When we turn from these mental states to the expression of them in language, we find the same distinction. An observation is properly the result of somewhat prolonged thought; a remark is usually suggested by some passing occurence; a notice is in most cases something cursory and short. This distinction is not always maintained as to remark and observe, which are often used interchangeably. ``Observing men may form many judgments by the rules of similitude and proportion.'' --I. Watts. ''He can not distinguish difficult and noble speculations from trifling and vulgar remarks.'' --Collier. ''The thing to be regarded, in taking notice of a child's miscarriage, is what root it springs from.'' --Locke. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • remark — vb 1 notice, note, observe, perceive, discern, *see, behold, descry, espy, view, survey, contemplate 2 Remark, comment, commentate, animadvert are comparable when they mean to make observations or to pass judgment but they diverge in their… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • remark — [ri märk′] vt. [Fr remarquer < re + marquer, to mark < It marcare < marca, a mark < Gmc * marka: see MARK1] 1. to notice; observe; perceive 2. to say or write as an observation or comment 3. Obs. to mark; distinguish; indicate vi. to… …   English World dictionary

  • Remark — ist der Familienname von Elfriede Remark (1903–1943), später Elfriede Scholz, Schwester von Erich Maria Remarque Erich Paul Remark (1898–1970), deutscher Autor, bekannt als Erich Maria Remarque Thomas Remark (* 1959), deutscher Fußballspieler …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Remark — Re*mark , n. [Cf. F. remarque.] 1. Act of remarking or attentively noticing; notice or observation. [1913 Webster] The cause, though worth the search, may yet elude Conjecture and remark, however shrewd. Cowper. [1913 Webster] 2. The expression,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Remark — Re*mark (r? m?rk ), v. i. To make a remark or remarks; to comment. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • remark — rèmark prid. <indekl.> DEFINICIJA koji upućuje na što; popratni SINTAGMA remark otisak tisk. prvi otisak bakropisa ili litografije s popratnim bilješkama ili crtežima ETIMOLOGIJA vidi remarka …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • remark — [n] comment, observation acknowledgment, annotation, assertion, attention, back talk, bon mot*, cognizance, comeback, commentary, conclusion, consideration, crack*, declaration, elucidation, exegesis, explanation, explication, exposition,… …   New thesaurus

  • remark — I noun animadversion, assertion, averment, comment, commentary, declaration, dictum, exclamation, expression, interjection, mention, note, observation, point, pronouncement, recitation, reflection, saying, speech, statement, thought, utterance,… …   Law dictionary

  • Remark —   [engl.], Kommentar …   Universal-Lexikon

  • remark — (v.) 1630s, to mark out, distinguish modeled on Fr. remarquer to mark, note, heed, from M.Fr. re , intensive prefix, + marquer to mark, probably from a Germanic source, Cf. O.H.G. marchon to delimit (see MARK (Cf. mark) (n.1)). Meaning make a… …   Etymology dictionary

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