Remand Re*mand" (r?-m?nd"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Remanded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Remanding}.] [F. remander to send word again, L. remandare; pref. re- re- + mandare to commit, order, send word. See {Mandate}.] To recommit; to send back. [1913 Webster]

Remand it to its former place. --South. [1913 Webster]

Then were they remanded to the cage again. --Bunyan. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • remand — re·mand 1 /ri mand/ vb [Anglo French remander, from Middle French, to order back, from Late Latin remandare to send back word, from Latin re back + mandare to order] vt 1: to return (a case or matter) from one court to another esp. lower court or …   Law dictionary

  • Remand — is a legal term which has two related but distinct usages. Its etymology is from the Latin re and mandare , literally to order. It evolved in Late Latin to remandare , or to send back word. It appears in Middle French as remander and in Middle… …   Wikipedia

  • Remand — Re*mand , n. The act of remanding; the order for recommitment. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • remand — (v.) mid 15c., from M.Fr. remander (12c.), from L.L. remandare to send back word, repeat a command, from L. re back + mandare to consign, order, commit to one s charge (see MANDATE (Cf. mandate)). Related: Remanded; remanding …   Etymology dictionary

  • remand — Law ► VERB ▪ place (a defendant) on bail or in custody, especially when a trial is adjourned. ► NOUN ▪ a committal to custody. ORIGIN Latin remandare commit again …   English terms dictionary

  • remand — [ri mand′] vt. [ME remaunden < OFr remander < LL remandare, to notify in return < L re , back + mandare, to order: see MANDATE] 1. to send back; order to go back 2. Law a) to send (a prisoner or accused person) back into custody, as to… …   English World dictionary

  • remand — I UK [rɪˈmɑːnd] / US [rɪˈmænd] verb [transitive, usually passive] Word forms remand : present tense I/you/we/they remand he/she/it remands present participle remanding past tense remanded past participle remanded legal to tell someone who has… …   English dictionary

  • remand — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun VERB + REMAND ▪ be held on ▪ He was held on remand, charged with causing malicious damage to property. REMAND + NOUN ▪ centre, home (both BrE) ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • remand — re|mand1 [rıˈma:nd US rıˈmænd] v [T usually passive] law [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: remander, from Late Latin remandare to send back word , from Latin mandare; MANDATE1] 1.) BrE to send someone back from a court of law, to wait for… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • remand — re|mand1 [ rı mænd ] verb transitive usually passive LEGAL to tell someone who has committed a crime to return to court for trial on a particular day: be remanded in custody (=kept in prison until your trial): All five men were remanded in… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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