Regrator
Regrator Re*grat"or (r?*gr?t"?r), n. One guilty of regrating. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Regrator — The middleman in the scheme of medieval trade where artisans and bakers or brewers etc. sold their own produce. The regrator bought bread or fish or other goods to sell on his own behalf, perhaps as a street hawker. He or she was bound by the… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • regrator — re·gra·tor …   English syllables

  • regrator — noun see regrater …   Useful english dictionary

  • Regrater — The middleman in the scheme of medieval trade where artisans and bakers or brewers etc. sold their own produce. The regrator bought bread or fish or other goods to sell on his own behalf, perhaps as a street hawker. He or she was bound by the… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Huckster — A petty trader, with a small market stall; a street hawker. Women were often forced to make a living in such trading, esp. when widowed without property. Cf. Femme sole; Regrator …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Regrate — The action of buying up goods in order to sell and make a middleman s profit. Cf. Regrator; Forestallers, Statute of …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Regratorie — The retail trade, that carried on by a *regrator. The word carried distinctly negative connotations: sharp practice or hucksterism are apt synonyms …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • auctionarius — /okshfiybneriyss/ A seller; a regrator; a retailer; one who bought and sold; an auctioneer, in the modern sense. One who buys poor, old, worn out things to sell again at a greater price …   Black's law dictionary

  • auctionarius — /okshfiybneriyss/ A seller; a regrator; a retailer; one who bought and sold; an auctioneer, in the modern sense. One who buys poor, old, worn out things to sell again at a greater price …   Black's law dictionary

  • regrating — In old English law, the offense of buying or getting into one s hands at a fair or market any provisions, corn, or other dead victual, with the intention of selling the same again in the same fair or market, or in some other within four miles… …   Black's law dictionary

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