Redounding
Redound Re*dound" (r?*dound"), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Redounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Redounding}.] [F. redonder, L. redundare; pref. red-, re-, re- + undare to rise in waves or surges, fr. unda a wave. See {Undulate}, and cf. {Redundant}.] 1. To roll back, as a wave or flood; to be sent or driven back; to flow back, as a consequence or effect; to conduce; to contribute; to result. [1913 Webster]

The evil, soon Driven back, redounded as a flood on those From whom it sprung. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The honor done to our religion ultimately redounds to God, the author of it. --Rogers. [1913 Webster]

both . . . will devour great quantities of paper, there will no small use redound from them to that manufacture. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. To be in excess; to remain over and above; to be redundant; to overflow. [1913 Webster]

For every dram of honey therein found, A pound of gall doth over it redound. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • redounding — re·dound || rɪ daÊŠnd v. accumulate, accrue, collect; have a desired result or effect; return, come back …   English contemporary dictionary

  • redounding — redoundˈing noun and adjective • • • Main Entry: ↑redound …   Useful english dictionary

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