Recurrent sensibility
Recurrent Re*cur"rent (-rent), a. [L. recurrens, -entis, p. pr. of recurrere: cf.F. r['e]current. See {Recur}.] 1. Returning from time to time; recurring; as, recurrent pains. [1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) Running back toward its origin; as, a recurrent nerve or artery. [1913 Webster]

{Recurrent fever}. (Med.) See {Relapsing fever}, under {Relapsing}.

{Recurrent pulse} (Physiol.), the pulse beat which appears (when the radial artery is compressed at the wrist) on the distal side of the point of pressure through the arteries of the palm of the hand.

{Recurrent sensibility} (Physiol.), the sensibility manifested by the anterior, or motor, roots of the spinal cord (their stimulation causing pain) owing to the presence of sensory fibers from the corresponding sensory or posterior roots. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Recurrent — Re*cur rent ( rent), a. [L. recurrens, entis, p. pr. of recurrere: cf.F. r[ e]current. See {Recur}.] 1. Returning from time to time; recurring; as, recurrent pains. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Running back toward its origin; as, a recurrent nerve… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Recurrent fever — Recurrent Re*cur rent ( rent), a. [L. recurrens, entis, p. pr. of recurrere: cf.F. r[ e]current. See {Recur}.] 1. Returning from time to time; recurring; as, recurrent pains. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Running back toward its origin; as, a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Recurrent pulse — Recurrent Re*cur rent ( rent), a. [L. recurrens, entis, p. pr. of recurrere: cf.F. r[ e]current. See {Recur}.] 1. Returning from time to time; recurring; as, recurrent pains. [1913 Webster] 2. (Anat.) Running back toward its origin; as, a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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