Recourse Re*course" (r?*k?rs"), n. [F. recours, L. recursus a running back, return, fr. recurrere, recursum, to run back. See {Recur}.] 1. A coursing back, or coursing again, along the line of a previous coursing; renewed course; return; retreat; recurence. [Obs.] ``Swift recourse of flushing blood.'' --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Unto my first I will have my recourse. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Preventive physic . . . preventeth sickness in the healthy, or the recourse thereof in the valetudinary. --Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster]

2. Recurrence in difficulty, perplexity, need, or the like; access or application for aid; resort. [1913 Webster]

Thus died this great peer, in a time of great recourse unto him and dependence upon him. --Sir H. Wotton. [1913 Webster]

Our last recourse is therefore to our art. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. Access; admittance. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Give me recourse to him. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Without recourse} (Commerce), words sometimes added to the indorsement of a negotiable instrument to protect the indorser from liability to the indorsee and subsequent holders. It is a restricted indorsement. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • recourse — re·course / rē ˌkōrs, ri kōrs/ n 1 a: the act of turning to someone or something for assistance esp. in obtaining redress b: a means to a desired end esp. in the nature of a remedy or justice; also: the end itself 2: the right or ability to… …   Law dictionary

  • recourse — [rē′kôrs΄, ri kôrs′] n. [ME recours < OFr < L recursus, a running back: see RE & COURSE] 1. a turning or seeking for aid, safety, etc. [to have recourse to the law] 2. that to which one turns seeking aid, safety, etc. [one s last recourse]… …   English World dictionary

  • recourse — ► NOUN 1) a source of help in a difficult situation. 2) (recourse to) the use of (someone or something) as a recourse. ORIGIN Latin recursus, from cursus course, running …   English terms dictionary

  • Recourse — Re*course , v. i. 1. To return; to recur. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The flame departing and recoursing. Foxe. [1913 Webster] 2. To have recourse; to resort. [Obs.] Bp. Hacket. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recourse — (n.) late 14c., from O.Fr. recours (13c.), from L. recursus return, retreat, lit. a running back, from stem of pp. of recurrere run back, return (see RECUR (Cf. recur)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • recourse — [n] alternative aid, appeal, choice, expediency, expedient, help, makeshift, option, refuge, remedy, resort, resource, shift, stand by, stopgap, substitute, support, way out; concepts 693,712 …   New thesaurus

  • recourse — Recourse, Recursus …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Recourse — Term describing a type of loan. If a loan is with recourse, the lender has a general claim against the parent company if the collateral is insufficient to repay the debt. The New York Times Financial Glossary * * * recourse re‧course [rɪˈkɔːs ǁ… …   Financial and business terms

  • recourse — The right to seek repayment of debt. Usually used to describe the right to seek repayment from an originator or prior endorser who sold or assigned debt to another party. American Banker Glossary Term describing a type of loan. If a loan is with… …   Financial and business terms

  • recourse — noun (formal) ADJECTIVE ▪ constant, frequent ▪ limited (esp. BrE), little ▪ Drivers have little recourse but to wait until the weather clears. ▪ no other …   Collocations dictionary

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