Reconcile Rec"on*cile` (-s?l`), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reconciled} (-s?ld`); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reconciling}.] [F. r['e]concilier, L. reconciliare; pref. re- re- + conciliare to bring together, to unite. See {Conciliate}.] 1. To cause to be friendly again; to conciliate anew; to restore to friendship; to bring back to harmony; to cause to be no longer at variance; as, to reconcile persons who have quarreled. [1913 Webster]

Propitious now and reconciled by prayer. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

The church [if defiled] is interdicted till it be reconciled [i.e., restored to sanctity] by the bishop. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

We pray you . . . be ye reconciled to God. --2 Cor. v. 20. [1913 Webster]

2. To bring to acquiescence, content, or quiet submission; as, to reconcile one's self to affictions. [1913 Webster]

3. To make consistent or congruous; to bring to agreement or suitableness; -- followed by with or to. [1913 Webster]

The great men among the ancients understood how to reconcile manual labor with affairs of state. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

Some figures monstrous and misshaped appear, Considered singly, or beheld too near; Which, but proportioned to their light or place, Due distance reconciles to form and grace. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. To adjust; to settle; as, to reconcile differences. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To reunite; conciliate; placate; propitiate; pacify; appease. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • reconcile — rec‧on‧cile [ˈrekənsaɪl] verb [transitive] ACCOUNTING to make two accounts or statements agree or add up to the same total: • This hurried attempt to reconcile the books was a mistake. * * * reconcile UK US /ˈrekənsaɪl/ verb [I or T] ► ACCOUNTING …   Financial and business terms

  • reconcile — rec·on·cile / re kən ˌsīl/ vb ciled, cil·ing vt 1 a: to restore to harmony reconciled the parties reconciled the marriage b: to bring to resolution …   Law dictionary

  • reconcile — [v1] make peace; adjust accommodate, accord, accustom, appease, arbitrate, arrange, assuage, attune, bring together, bring to terms, bury the hatchet*, come together, compose, conciliate, conform, cool*, coordinate, fit, fix up, get together on,… …   New thesaurus

  • reconcile — ► VERB 1) restore friendly relations between. 2) make or show to be compatible. 3) (reconcile to) make (someone) accept (a disagreeable thing). DERIVATIVES reconcilable adjective reconciliation noun. ORIGIN …   English terms dictionary

  • Reconcile — Rec on*cile , v. i. To become reconciled. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reconcile — (v.) c.1300, of persons, from L. reconcilare to bring together again, from re again (see RE (Cf. re )) + concilare make friendly (see CONCILIATE (Cf. conciliate)). Reflexive sense is recorded from 1530s. Meaning to make (discordant facts or… …   Etymology dictionary

  • reconcile — conform, accommodate, adjust, *adapt Analogous words: harmonize, accord, square, *agree: *correct, rectify, amend, revise …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reconcile — [rek′ən sīl΄] vt. reconciled, reconciling [ME reconsilen < OFr reconcilier < L reconciliare: see RE & CONCILIATE] 1. to make friendly again or win over to a friendly attitude 2. to settle (a quarrel, difference, etc.) 3. to make (arguments …   English World dictionary

  • reconcile — UK [ˈrekənsaɪl] / US [ˈrekənˌsaɪl] verb Word forms reconcile : present tense I/you/we/they reconcile he/she/it reconciles present participle reconciling past tense reconciled past participle reconciled 1) [transitive] to find a way to make ideas …   English dictionary

  • reconcile — v. 1) (D; refl., tr.) to reconcile to (he had to reconcile himself to his fate) 2) (D; tr.) to reconcile with (we tried to reconcile her with her family; to reconcile a checkbook with a bank statement) * * * [ rekənsaɪl] (D;refl.,tr.) to… …   Combinatory dictionary

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