Rear Rear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reared} (r[=e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Rearing}.] [AS. r[=ae]ran to raise, rear, elevate, for r[=ae]san, causative of r[=i]san to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Raise}.] 1. To raise; to lift up; to cause to rise, become erect, etc.; to elevate; as, to rear a monolith. [1913 Webster]

In adoration at his feet I fell Submiss; he reared me. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

It reareth our hearts from vain thoughts. --Barrow. [1913 Webster]

Mine [shall be] the first hand to rear her banner. --Ld. Lytton. [1913 Webster]

2. To erect by building; to set up; to construct; as, to rear defenses or houses; to rear one government on the ruins of another. [1913 Webster]

One reared a font of stone. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

3. To lift and take up. [Obs. or R.] [1913 Webster]

And having her from Trompart lightly reared, Upon his courser set the lovely load. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

4. To bring up to maturity, as young; to educate; to instruct; to foster; as, to rear offspring. [1913 Webster]

He wants a father to protect his youth, And rear him up to virtue. --Southern. [1913 Webster]

5. To breed and raise; as, to rear cattle. [1913 Webster]

6. To rouse; to stir up. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

And seeks the tusky boar to rear. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To lift; elevate; erect; raise; build; establish. See the Note under {Raise}, 3 (c) . [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rear — Rear, a. Being behind, or in the hindmost part; hindmost; as, the rear rank of a company. [1913 Webster] {Rear admiral}, an officer in the navy, next in rank below a vice admiral and above a commodore. See {Admiral}. {Rear front} (Mil.), the rear …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rear — rear1 [rir] n. [prob. back form. < REAR(WARD), REAR (GUARD)] 1. the back or hind part of something 2. the place or position behind or at the back [at the rear of the house] 3. the part of a military or naval force farthest from the enemy ☆ 4 …   English World dictionary

  • rear — [adj] back, end aft, after, astern, backward, behind, dorsal, following, hind, hinder, hindermost, hindmost, last, mizzen, posterior, postern, rearmost, rearward, retral, reverse, stern, tail; concept 583 Ant. beginning, front rear [n] back or… …   New thesaurus

  • rear — Ⅰ. rear [1] ► NOUN 1) the back or hindmost part of something. 2) (also rear end) informal a person s buttocks. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ at the back. ● bring up the rear Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • rear- — comb. form, partly of OF. or AF. origin, as in rear ward, guard, rearsupper (and hence by analogy in rear admiral, feast, freight), partly ad. F. arrière , as in rear vassal, vault, and partly (from c 1600) an attributive use of rear n …   Useful english dictionary

  • Rear — (r[=e]r), v. t. To place in the rear; to secure the rear of. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rear — Rear, n. [OF. riere behind, backward, fr. L. retro. Cf. {Arrear}.] 1. The back or hindmost part; that which is behind, or last in order; opposed to {front}. [1913 Webster] Nipped with the lagging rear of winter s frost. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rear — may be used as a noun and a verb and has several meanings: * Rear (military) the area of a battlefield behind the front line *Animals: **In stockbreeding, to breed and raise **Rear (horse), when a horse lifts its front legs off the ground *Rear… …   Wikipedia

  • Rear — (r[=e]r), adv. Early; soon. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] Then why does Cuddy leave his cot so rear? Gay. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rear — Rear, v. i. To rise up on the hind legs, as a horse; to become erect. [1913 Webster] {Rearing bit}, a bit designed to prevent a horse from lifting his head when rearing. Knight. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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