Reap Reap (r[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reaped} (r[=e]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reaping}.] [OE. repen, AS. r[=i]pan to seize, reap; cf. D. rapen to glean, reap, G. raufen to pluck, Goth. raupjan, or E. ripe.] 1. To cut with a sickle, scythe, or reaping machine, as grain; to gather, as a harvest, by cutting. [1913 Webster]

When ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt not wholly reap the corners of thy field. --Lev. xix. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. To gather; to obtain; to receive as a reward or harvest, or as the fruit of labor or of works; -- in a good or a bad sense; as, to reap a benefit from exertions. [1913 Webster]

Why do I humble thus myself, and, suing For peace, reap nothing but repulse and hate? --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. To clear of a crop by reaping; as, to reap a field. [1913 Webster]

4. To deprive of the beard; to shave. [R.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Reaping hook}, an implement having a hook-shaped blade, used in reaping; a sickle; -- in a specific sense, distinguished from a sickle by a blade keen instead of serrated. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reap — may refer to: *Reap, to Harvest grain crops **Reaper, a horse drawn farm implement invented in 1831 and patented by Cyrus McCormick **Reaping hook, see Sickle *Grim Reaper (disambiguation) **Grim Reaper, see Death (personification) * Whatsoever a …   Wikipedia

  • reap — UK US /riːp/ verb [T] ► to make a large amount of money or a big profit: »Outside shareholders reaped 25% of the dividends generated. reap $35 million/£1.9 billion, etc. »His company has reaped more than $800 million in federal contracts over the …   Financial and business terms

  • reap — [ri:p] v [: Old English; Origin: reopan] 1.) [T] to get something, especially something good, as a result of what you have done reap the benefit/reward/profit (of sth) ▪ Those who do take risks often reap the rewards. 2.) you reap what you sow… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • reap — reap, glean, gather, garner, harvest are comparable when they mean to do the work or a given part of the work of collecting ripened crops. Reap applies to the cutting down and usually collecting of ripened grain; in extension, it may suggest a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Reap — Reap, v. i. To perform the act or operation of reaping; to gather a harvest. [1913 Webster] They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. Ps. cxxvi. 5. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reap — Reap, n. [Cf. AS. r[=i]p harvest. See {Reap}, v.] A bundle of grain; a handful of grain laid down by the reaper as it is cut. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Wright. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reap — [ rip ] verb transitive 1. ) to cut and gather a crop such as wheat 2. ) to get something as a result of something that you do: We will all reap the benefits of this important research. reap what you sow used for saying that something happens to… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • reap — ► VERB 1) cut or gather (a crop or harvest). 2) receive as a consequence of one s own or others actions. ● you reap what you sow Cf. ↑you reap what you sow ORIGIN Old English …   English terms dictionary

  • reap — (v.) to cut grain with a hook or sickle, O.E. reopan, Mercian form of ripan to reap, related to O.E. ripe ripe (see RIPE (Cf. ripe)). Related: Reaped; reaping …   Etymology dictionary

  • reap — reap·er; reap; …   English syllables

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