Raught
Reach Reach, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reached} (r[=e]cht) ({Raught}, the old preterit, is obsolete); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reaching}.] [OE. rechen, AS. r[=ae]can, r[=ae]cean, to extend, stretch out; akin to D. reiken, G. reichen, and possibly to AS. r[=i]ce powerful, rich, E. rich. [root]115.] 1. To extend; to stretch; to thrust out; to put forth, as a limb, a member, something held, or the like. [1913 Webster]

Her tresses yellow, and long straughten, Unto her heeles down they raughten. --Rom. of R. [1913 Webster]

Reach hither thy hand and thrust it into my side. --John xx. 27. [1913 Webster]

Fruit trees, over woody, reached too far Their pampered boughs. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to deliver by stretching out a member, especially the hand; to give with the hand; to pass to another; to hand over; as, to reach one a book. [1913 Webster]

He reached me a full cup. --2 Esd. xiv. 39. [1913 Webster]

3. To attain or obtain by stretching forth the hand; to extend some part of the body, or something held by one, so as to touch, strike, grasp, or the like; as, to reach an object with the hand, or with a spear. [1913 Webster]

O patron power, . . . thy present aid afford, Than I may reach the beast. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To strike, hit, or touch with a missile; as, to reach an object with an arrow, a bullet, or a shell. [1913 Webster]

5. Hence, to extend an action, effort, or influence to; to penetrate to; to pierce, or cut, as far as. [1913 Webster]

If these examples of grown men reach not the case of children, let them examine. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

6. To extend to; to stretch out as far as; to touch by virtue of extent; as, his land reaches the river. [1913 Webster]

Thy desire . . . leads to no excess That reaches blame. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

7. To arrive at; to come to; to get as far as. [1913 Webster]

Before this letter reaches your hands. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

8. To arrive at by effort of any kind; to attain to; to gain; to be advanced to. [1913 Webster]

The best account of the appearances of nature which human penetration can reach, comes short of its reality. --Cheyne. [1913 Webster]

9. To understand; to comprehend. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Do what, sir? I reach you not. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster]

10. To overreach; to deceive. [Obs.] --South. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Raught — (r[add]t), obs. imp. & p. p. of {Reach}. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Raught — Raught, obs. imp. & p. p. of {Reck}. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • raught — Etymology: Middle English raughte (past), raught (past participle), from Old English rǣhte (past), gerǣht (past participle) more at reach dialect chiefly Britain past of reach …   Useful english dictionary

  • raught — See reek …   Oldest English Words

  • raught — v. reach, catch up to , arrive at (Archaic) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • ore-raught — ore wrought or ore raught adjective Shakespearean forms of over reached in the sense of overtook • • • Main Entry: ↑ore …   Useful english dictionary

  • Arraught — Ar*raught [The past tense of an old v. areach or arreach. Cf. {Reach}, obs. pret. raught.] Obtained; seized. Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • EIF4G3 — Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma, 3, also known as EIF4G3, is a human gene.cite web | title = Entrez Gene: EIF4G3 eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma, 3| url = http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene… …   Wikipedia

  • nosel — Noursle Nour sle, v. t. [Freq., fr. OE. nourse. See {Nurse}.] To nurse; to rear; to bring up. [Obs.] [Written also {nosel}, {nousel}, {nousle}, {nowsle}, {nusle}, {nuzzle}, etc.] [1913 Webster] She noursled him till years he raught. Spenser.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Noursle — Nour sle, v. t. [Freq., fr. OE. nourse. See {Nurse}.] To nurse; to rear; to bring up. [Obs.] [Written also {nosel}, {nousel}, {nousle}, {nowsle}, {nusle}, {nuzzle}, etc.] [1913 Webster] She noursled him till years he raught. Spenser. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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