Ratchet brace
Ratchet Ratch"et (-[e^]t), n. [Properly a diminutive from the same word as rack: cf. F. rochet. See 2d {Ratch}, {Rack} the instrument.] 1. A pawl, click, or detent, for holding or propelling a ratchet wheel, or ratch, etc. [1913 Webster]

2. A mechanism composed of a ratchet wheel, or ratch, and pawl. See {Ratchet wheel}, below, and 2d {Ratch}. [1913 Webster]

{Ratchet brace} (Mech.), a boring brace, having a ratchet wheel and pawl for rotating the tool by back and forth movements of the brace handle.

{Ratchet drill}, a portable machine for working a drill by hand, consisting of a hand lever carrying at one end a drill holder which is revolved by means of a ratchet wheel and pawl, by swinging the lever back and forth.

{Ratchet wheel} (Mach.), a circular wheel having teeth, usually angular, with which a reciprocating pawl engages to turn the wheel forward, or a stationary pawl to hold it from turning backward. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster]

Note: In the cut, the moving pawl c slides over the teeth in one direction, but in returning, draws the wheel with it, while the pawl d prevents it from turning in the contrary direction. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ratchet brace — noun 1. : a carpenter s bitbrace that has a ratchet driven chuck and is used in close quarters where complete revolutions of the handle are impossible 2. : a lever that has a ratchet driven chuck at one end and is used for drilling holes in metal …   Useful english dictionary

  • Ratchet — Ratch et ( [e^]t), n. [Properly a diminutive from the same word as rack: cf. F. rochet. See 2d {Ratch}, {Rack} the instrument.] 1. A pawl, click, or detent, for holding or propelling a ratchet wheel, or ratch, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. A mechanism… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ratchet drill — Ratchet Ratch et ( [e^]t), n. [Properly a diminutive from the same word as rack: cf. F. rochet. See 2d {Ratch}, {Rack} the instrument.] 1. A pawl, click, or detent, for holding or propelling a ratchet wheel, or ratch, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ratchet wheel — Ratchet Ratch et ( [e^]t), n. [Properly a diminutive from the same word as rack: cf. F. rochet. See 2d {Ratch}, {Rack} the instrument.] 1. A pawl, click, or detent, for holding or propelling a ratchet wheel, or ratch, etc. [1913 Webster] 2. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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