rancour
Rancor Ran"cor (r[a^][ng]"k[~e]r), n. [Written also {rancour}.] [OE. rancour, OF. rancor, rancur, F. rancune, fr. L. rancor rancidity, rankness; tropically, an old grudge, rancor, fr. rancere to be rank or rancid.] The deepest malignity or spite; deep-seated enmity or malice; inveterate hatred. ``To stint rancour and dissencioun.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

It would not be easy to conceive the passion, rancor, and malice of their tongues and hearts. --Burke. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Enmity; hatred; ill will; malice; spite; grudge; animosity; malignity.

Usage: {Rancor}, {Enmity}. Enmity and rancor both describe hostile feelings; but enmity may be generous and open, while rancor implies personal malice of the worst and most enduring nature, and is the strongest word in our language to express hostile feelings. [1913 Webster]

Rancor will out; proud prelate, in thy face I see thy fury. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Rancor is that degree of malice which preys upon the possessor. --Cogan. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • rancour — (n.) British English spelling of RANCOR (Cf. rancor); for ending see OR (Cf. or). Related: Rancourous …   Etymology dictionary

  • rancour — meaning ‘malignant dislike’, is spelt our in BrE and rancor in AmE …   Modern English usage

  • rancour — (US rancor) ► NOUN ▪ bitterness; resentment. DERIVATIVES rancorous adjective. ORIGIN Latin rancor rankness , later bitter grudge …   English terms dictionary

  • rancour — n. 1) to stir up rancour 2) to express; feel; show rancour 3) deep seated rancour 4) rancour against, towards (to feel rancour towards smb.) * * * [ ræŋkə] feel show rancour towards (to feel rancour towards smb.) deep seated rancour to …   Combinatory dictionary

  • rancour — ran|cour BrE rancor AmE [ˈræŋkə US ər] n [U] [Date: 1100 1200; : Old French; Origin: Late Latin, from Latin rancere; RANCID] formal a feeling of hatred and anger towards someone you cannot forgive because they harmed you in the past →↑resentment… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • rancour — [14] To account for rancour and its close relative rancid we have to postulate a Latin verb *rancēre ‘stink’, never actually recorded but inferable from its present participle rancēns ‘stinking, putrid’. From it were derived the adjective… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • rancour — [[t]ræ̱ŋkə(r)[/t]] N UNCOUNT Rancour is a feeling of bitterness and anger. [FORMAL] That s too bad, Teddy said without rancour. Syn: bitterness (in AM, use rancor) …   English dictionary

  • rancour — [14] To account for rancour and its close relative rancid we have to postulate a Latin verb *rancēre ‘stink’, never actually recorded but inferable from its present participle rancēns ‘stinking, putrid’. From it were derived the adjective… …   Word origins

  • rancour — BrE rancor AmE noun (U) formal a feeling of hatred, especially when you cannot forgive someone: He spoke openly about the war without a trace of rancour. rancorous adjective rancorously adverb …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • rancour — British variant of rancor …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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