Ramify
Ramify Ram"i*fy (r[a^]m"[i^]*f[imac]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ramified} (-f[imac]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Ramifying}.] [F. ramifier, LL. ramificare, fr. L. ramus a branch + -ficare (in comp.) to make. See {-fy}.] To divide into branches or subdivisions; as, to ramify an art, subject, scheme. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Ramify — Ram i*fy, v. i. 1. To shoot, or divide, into branches or subdivisions, as the stem of a plant. [1913 Webster] When they [asparagus plants] . . . begin to ramify. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. To be divided or subdivided, as a main subject. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ramify — index bifurcate, radiate, spread Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • ramify — (v.) 1540s, branch out, from M.Fr. ramifier (early 14c.), from M.L. ramificare, from L. ramus branch (see RAMUS (Cf. ramus)) + root of facere to make (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Related: Ramified; ramifying …   Etymology dictionary

  • ramify — ► VERB (ramifies, ramified) ▪ form branches or cause to branch out. ORIGIN Latin ramificare, from ramus branch …   English terms dictionary

  • ramify — [ram′əfī΄] vt., vi. ramified, ramifying [Fr ramifier < ML ramificare < L ramus, branch (see ROOT1) + facere, to make, DO1] to divide or spread out into branches or branchlike divisions …   English World dictionary

  • ramify — verb To divide into branches or subdivisions; as, to ramify an art, subject, scheme. See Also: ramification …   Wiktionary

  • ramify — [16] Ramify has no connection with rams. It comes ultimately from Latin rāmus ‘branch’, ramp 412 which probably goes back to the same source as produced Latin rādīx ‘root’ (ancestor of English radical and radish) and English root. From it was… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • ramify — [16] Ramify has no connection with rams. It comes ultimately from Latin rāmus ‘branch’, which probably goes back to the same source as produced Latin rādīx ‘root’ (ancestor of English radical and radish) and English root. From it was derived the… …   Word origins

  • ramify — verb ( fied; fying) Etymology: Middle English ramifien, from Anglo French ramifier, from Medieval Latin ramificare, from Latin ramus branch; akin to Latin radix root more at root Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to split up into branches… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • ramify — v.; fied; fying [L. ramus, branch; ficere, to make] To send forth outgrowth or branches …   Dictionary of invertebrate zoology

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