Rail train
Rail Rail, n. [Akin to LG. & Sw. regel bar, bolt, G. riegel a rail, bar, or bolt, OHG. rigil, rigel, bar, bolt, and possibly to E. row a line.] 1. A bar of timber or metal, usually horizontal or nearly so, extending from one post or support to another, as in fences, balustrades, staircases, etc. [1913 Webster]

2. (Arch.) A horizontal piece in a frame or paneling. See Illust. of {Style}. [1913 Webster]

3. (Railroad) A bar of steel or iron, forming part of the track on which the wheels roll. It is usually shaped with reference to vertical strength, and is held in place by chairs, splices, etc. [1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) (a) The stout, narrow plank that forms the top of the bulwarks. (b) The light, fencelike structures of wood or metal at the break of the deck, and elsewhere where such protection is needed. [1913 Webster]

5. A railroad as a means of transportation; as, to go by rail; a place not accesible by rail. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

6. a railing. [PJC]

{Rail fence}. See under {Fence}.

{Rail guard}. (a) A device attached to the front of a locomotive on each side for clearing the rail of obstructions. (b) A guard rail. See under {Guard}.

{Rail joint} (Railroad), a splice connecting the adjacent ends of rails, in distinction from a chair, which is merely a seat. The two devices are sometimes united. Among several hundred varieties, the fish joint is standard. See {Fish joint}, under {Fish}.

{Rail train} (Iron & Steel Manuf.), a train of rolls in a rolling mill, for making rails for railroads from blooms or billets. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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