Pursing
Purse Purse, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pursed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pursing}.] 1. To put into a purse. [1913 Webster]

I will go and purse the ducats straight. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse; to pucker; to knit. [1913 Webster]

Thou . . . didst contract and purse thy brow. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pursing — present part of purse * * * pursing, vbl. n. and ppl. a. see purse v …   Useful english dictionary

  • pursing — drawing a purse line closed on a purse seine …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • pursing — pÉœrs /pɜːs n. handbag, pocketbook; wallet, billfold; wealth, money; treasury, fund v. pucker, constrict into folds or wrinkles (about the lips, etc.) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • pursing string — purse line …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • pursing wire — a wire purse line …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • snout reflex — pursing of the lips into a snout shape when there is a light tap near the midline of the lips, occurring normally during infancy; although its appearance later in life may indicate neurologic disease, it is also seen in healthy individuals …   Medical dictionary

  • Bachelor of Education — A Bachelor of Education (BEd) is an undergraduate academic degree which qualifies the graduate as a teacher in schools.North AmericaIn North America the degree is awarded for courses taken that generally last two years (one year in some Canadian… …   Wikipedia

  • Purse — Purse, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pursed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pursing}.] 1. To put into a purse. [1913 Webster] I will go and purse the ducats straight. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pursed — Purse Purse, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pursed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pursing}.] 1. To put into a purse. [1913 Webster] I will go and purse the ducats straight. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mim — adjective Etymology: imitative of the act of pursing the lips Date: circa 1586 dialect affectedly shy or modest …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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