Pure mathematics
Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See {Trace}.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. [1913 Webster]

2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. [1913 Webster]

3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to {concrete}; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile'' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name'' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. [1913 Webster]

4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{An abstract idea} (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure.

{Abstract terms}, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities.

{Abstract numbers} (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete.

{Abstract mathematics} or {Pure mathematics}. See {Mathematics}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pure mathematics — Pure Pure, a. [Compar. {Purer}; superl. {Purest}.] [OE. pur, F. pur, fr. L. purus; akin to putus pure, clear, putare to clean, trim, prune, set in order, settle, reckon, consider, think, Skr. p? to clean, and perh. E. fire. Cf. {Putative}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pure mathematics — Broadly speaking, pure mathematics is mathematics motivated entirely for reasons other than application. It is distinguished by its rigour, abstraction and beauty. From the eighteenth century onwards, this was a recognized category of… …   Wikipedia

  • pure mathematics — noun the branches of mathematics that study and develop the principles of mathematics for their own sake rather than for their immediate usefulness • Hypernyms: ↑mathematics, ↑math, ↑maths • Hyponyms: ↑arithmetic, ↑geometry, ↑numerical analysis,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • pure mathematics — noun Mathematics which is done for its own sake rather than being motivated by other sciences. Ant: applied mathematics …   Wiktionary

  • pure mathematics — theoretical mathematics, abstract mathematics …   English contemporary dictionary

  • pure mathematics — plural noun see mathematics …   English new terms dictionary

  • A Course of Pure Mathematics — Cover of Third Revision 1921 A Course of Pure Mathematics (ISBN 0521720559) is a classic textbook in introductory mathematical analysis, written by G. H. Hardy. It is recommended for people studying calculus. First publish …   Wikipedia

  • Fielden Chair of Pure Mathematics — The Fielden Chair of Pure Mathematics is an endowed professorial position in the School of Mathematics, University of Manchester, England. In 1870 Samuel Fielden, a wealthy mill owner from Todmorden, donated £150 to Owen s College (as the… …   Wikipedia

  • Sadleirian Professor of Pure Mathematics — The Sadleirian Chair is a Professorship in pure mathematics at the University of Cambridge.It was established in 1701 by Lady Mary Sadleir, who made provision in her will for lecturers in algebra to be funded at nine colleges in the university.… …   Wikipedia

  • Pure — Pure, a. [Compar. {Purer}; superl. {Purest}.] [OE. pur, F. pur, fr. L. purus; akin to putus pure, clear, putare to clean, trim, prune, set in order, settle, reckon, consider, think, Skr. p? to clean, and perh. E. fire. Cf. {Putative}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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