Proverb
Proverb Prov"erb, n. [OE. proverbe, F. proverbe, from L. proverbium; pro before, for + verbum a word. See {Verb}.] 1. An old and common saying; a phrase which is often repeated; especially, a sentence which briefly and forcibly expresses some practical truth, or the result of experience and observation; a maxim; a saw; an adage. --Chaucer. Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. A striking or paradoxical assertion; an obscure saying; an enigma; a parable. [1913 Webster]

His disciples said unto him, Lo, now speakest thou plainly, and speakest no proverb. --John xvi. 29. [1913 Webster]

3. A familiar illustration; a subject of contemptuous reference. [1913 Webster]

Thou shalt become an astonishment, a proverb, and a by word, among all nations. --Deut. xxviii. 37. [1913 Webster]

4. A drama exemplifying a proverb. [1913 Webster]

{Book of Proverbs}, a canonical book of the Old Testament, containing a great variety of wise maxims. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Maxim; aphorism; apothegm; adage; saw. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • Proverb — La musique polyphonique de Pérotin (Alleluia), une source d inspiration de Proverb Genre …   Wikipédia en Français

  • proverb — PROVÉRB, proverbe, s.n. 1. Învăţătură morală populară născută din experienţă, exprimată printr o formulă eliptică sugestivă, de obicei metaforică, ritmică sau rimată; zicală, zicătoare, parimie. 2. (Franţuzism) Operă dramatică scurtă, al cărei… …   Dicționar Român

  • PROVERB — (Heb. מָשָׁל, mashal; pl. מְשָׁלִים, meshalim). The term proverb as a translation of the biblical Hebrew word mashal denotes certain specific literary forms, particularly of wisdom literature. Several of these forms are also referred to by the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Proverb — Prov erb, v. t. 1. To name in, or as, a proverb. [R.] [1913 Webster] Am I not sung and proverbed for a fool ? Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. To provide with a proverb. [R.] [1913 Webster] I am proverbed with a grandsire phrase. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proverb — [präv′ərb] n. [OFr proverbe < L proverbium < pro , PRO 2 + verbum, word: see VERB] 1. a short, traditional saying that expresses some obvious truth or familiar experience; adage; maxim 2. a person or thing that has become commonly… …   English World dictionary

  • Proverb — Prov erb, v. i. To write or utter proverbs. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • proverb — index maxim, phrase Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • proverb — (n.) c.1300, in boke of Prouerbyys, the Old Testament book, from O.Fr. proverbe (12c.), from L. proverbium a common saying, lit. words put forward, from pro forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + verbum word (see VERB (Cf. verb)). Used generally from late… …   Etymology dictionary

  • proverb — maxim, adage, motto, *saying, saw, epigram, aphorism, apothegm …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • proverb — [n] saying referring to common fact, knowledge adage, aphorism, apophthegm, axiom, byword, catch phrase, daffodil*, dictum, epigram, folk wisdom, gnome, maxim, moral, motto, platitude, precept, repartee, saw*, text, truism, witticism, word;… …   New thesaurus

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