prose Edda
Edda Ed"da, n.; pl. {Eddas}. [Icel., lit. great-grandmother (i. e., of Scandinavian poetry), so called by Bishop Brynj['u]lf Sveinsson, who brought it again to light in 1643.] The religious or mythological book of the old Scandinavian tribes of German origin, containing two collections of Sagas (legends, myths) of the old northern gods and heroes. [1913 Webster]

Note: There are two Eddas. The older, consisting of 39 poems, was reduced to writing from oral tradition in Iceland between 1050 and 1133. The younger or {prose Edda}, called also the {Edda of Snorri}, is the work of several writers, though usually ascribed to Snorri Sturleson, who was born in 1178.


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Prose Edda — Infobox Book name = Prose Edda translator = image caption = This colourful front page of the Prose Edda in an 18th century Icelandic manuscript shows Odin, Heimdallr, Sleipnir and other figures from Norse mythology. author = Snorri Sturluson… …   Wikipedia

  • Prose Edda — (Snorra Edda, Younger Edda)    by Snorri Sturluson (ca. 1225)    The Prose Edda, or the Edda of SNORRI STURLUSON (Snorra Edda), is a 13th century handbook of mythology and of poetics, written in part to instruct and support young poets in the… …   Encyclopedia of medieval literature

  • Prose Edda. — See under Edda. * * * …   Universalium

  • Prose Edda. — See under Edda …   Useful english dictionary

  • Edda — Ed da, n.; pl. {Eddas}. [Icel., lit. great grandmother (i. e., of Scandinavian poetry), so called by Bishop Brynj[ u]lf Sveinsson, who brought it again to light in 1643.] The religious or mythological book of the old Scandinavian tribes of German …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Edda of Snorri — Edda Ed da, n.; pl. {Eddas}. [Icel., lit. great grandmother (i. e., of Scandinavian poetry), so called by Bishop Brynj[ u]lf Sveinsson, who brought it again to light in 1643.] The religious or mythological book of the old Scandinavian tribes of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Edda — 1771, by some identified with the name of the old woman in the O.N. poem Rigsþul, by others derived from O.N. oðr spirit, mind, passion, song, poetry (cognate with O.Ir. faith poet, Welsh gwawd poem, O.E. woþ sound, melody, song, L. vates seer,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Edda — This page refers to the Eddur, poems and tales of Norse Mythology. For Edda, the ancestress of serfs in the Rígsthula, see Ríg. For the Hungarian rock group, see Edda művek. The term Edda (Plural: Eddas or Norse plural: Eddur) applies to the Old… …   Wikipedia

  • Edda — /ed euh/, n. a female given name. Also, Eda. Eddic, Eddaic /e day ik/, adj. /ed euh/, n. either of two old Icelandic literary works, one a collection of poems on mythical and religious subjects (Elder Edda or Poetic Edda) erroneously attributed… …   Universalium

  • Edda(s) —    The Eddas, the source books of Nordic myths, have come to us mainly in three texts. The oldest of these is the Elder Edda or Codex Regius, considered to have been drawn up by the Icelandic historian Saemund about the year 1090.    The next is… …   Who’s Who in non-classical mythology

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