Property Prop"er*ty, n.; pl. {Properties}. [OE. proprete, OF. propret['e] property, F. propret['e] neatness, cleanliness, propri['e]t['e] property, fr. L. proprietas. See {Proper}, a., and cf. {Propriety}.] [1913 Webster] 1. That which is proper to anything; a peculiar quality of a thing; that which is inherent in a subject, or naturally essential to it; an attribute; as, sweetness is a property of sugar. [1913 Webster]

Property is correctly a synonym for peculiar quality; but it is frequently used as coextensive with quality in general. --Sir W. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

Note: In physical science, the properties of matter are distinguished to the three following classes: 1. Physical properties, or those which result from the relations of bodies to the physical agents, light, heat, electricity, gravitation, cohesion, adhesion, etc., and which are exhibited without a change in the composition or kind of matter acted on. They are color, luster, opacity, transparency, hardness, sonorousness, density, crystalline form, solubility, capability of osmotic diffusion, vaporization, boiling, fusion, etc. 2. Chemical properties, or those which are conditioned by affinity and composition; thus, combustion, explosion, and certain solutions are reactions occasioned by chemical properties. Chemical properties are identical when there is identity of composition and structure, and change according as the composition changes. 3. Organoleptic properties, or those forming a class which can not be included in either of the other two divisions. They manifest themselves in the contact of substances with the organs of taste, touch, and smell, or otherwise affect the living organism, as in the manner of medicines and poisons. [1913 Webster]

2. An acquired or artificial quality; that which is given by art, or bestowed by man; as, the poem has the properties which constitute excellence. [1913 Webster]

3. The exclusive right of possessing, enjoying, and disposing of a thing; ownership; title. [1913 Webster]

Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity and property of blood. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Shall man assume a property in man? --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster]

4. That to which a person has a legal title, whether in his possession or not; thing owned; an estate, whether in lands, goods, or money; as, a man of large property, or small property. [1913 Webster]

5. pl. All the adjuncts of a play except the scenery and the dresses of the actors; stage requisites. [1913 Webster]

I will draw a bill of properties. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. Propriety; correctness. [Obs.] --Camden. [1913 Webster]

{Literary property}. (Law) See under {Literary}.

{Property man}, one who has charge of the ``properties'' of a theater. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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