Proceed
Proceed Pro*ceed", v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Proceeded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Proceeding}.] [F. proc['e]der. fr. L. procedere, processum, to go before, to proceed; pro forward + cedere to move. See {Cede}.] 1. To move, pass, or go forward or onward; to advance; to continue or renew motion begun; as, to proceed on a journey. [1913 Webster]

If thou proceed in this thy insolence. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To pass from one point, topic, or stage, to another; as, to proceed with a story or argument. [1913 Webster]

3. To issue or come forth as from a source or origin; to come from; as, light proceeds from the sun. [1913 Webster]

I proceeded forth and came from God. --John viii. 42. [1913 Webster]

It proceeds from policy, not love. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To go on in an orderly or regulated manner; to begin and carry on a series of acts or measures; to act by method; to prosecute a design. [1913 Webster]

He that proceeds upon other principles in his inquiry. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

5. To be transacted; to take place; to occur. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

He will, after his sour fashion, tell you What hath proceeded worthy note to-day. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. To have application or effect; to operate. [1913 Webster]

This rule only proceeds and takes place when a person can not of common law condemn another by his sentence. --Ayliffe. [1913 Webster]

7. (Law) To begin and carry on a legal process. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To advance; go on; continue; progress; issue; arise; emanate. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • proceed — pro‧ceed [prəˈsiːd] verb [intransitive] formal to continue to do something that has been started: • The discussions between the two firms are proceeding slowly but satisfactorily. • In order to proceed, Millicom needs a radio frequency to test… …   Financial and business terms

  • proceed — I (continue) verb begin again, begin where one left off, carry on, get back to work, get on, recommence, reinstate, renew, resume, return, take up again II (co forward) verb act, advance, arise, emanate, ensue, extend, flow, follow, follow a… …   Law dictionary

  • proceed — [v1] physically or mentally carry on, carry out advance, continue, fare, get, get going, get on with, get under way*, go ahead, go on, hie, journey, make a start, march, move on, move out, pass, press on, progress, push on, repair, set in motion …   New thesaurus

  • proceed — [prō sēd′, prəsēd′] vi. [ME proceden < MFr proceder < L procedere < pro , forward + cedere, to go: see PRO 2 & CEDE] 1. to advance or go on, esp. after stopping 2. to go on speaking, esp. after an interruption 3. to undertake and carry… …   English World dictionary

  • Proceed — Pro ceed, n. See {Proceeds}. [Obs.] Howell. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Proceed — Allgemeine Informationen Genre(s) EBM, Elektro Gründung 1999 Website http://www.proce …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • proceed — (v.) late 14c., to go on, also to emanate from, from O.Fr. proceder (13c.) and directly from L. procedere go forward, advance, from pro forward (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + cedere to go (see CEDE (Cf. cede)) Proceeds (n.) …   Etymology dictionary

  • proceed — issue, emanate, stem, flow, derive, *spring, arise, rise, originate Analogous words: *follow, succeed, ensue: *come, arrive …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • proceed — ► VERB 1) begin a course of action. 2) go on to do something. 3) (of an action) carry on or continue. 4) move forward. 5) Law start a lawsuit against someone. ORIGIN Latin procedere, from pro forward + cedere go …   English terms dictionary

  • proceed — pro|ceed W3S3 [prəˈsi:d] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: proceder, from [i]Latin procedere to go forward ] 1.) formal to continue to do something that has already been planned or started →↑proceeds proceed with ▪ The government was… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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