Prize court
Prize Prize (pr[imac]z), n. [F. prise a seizing, hold, grasp, fr. pris, p. p. of prendre to take, L. prendere, prehendere; in some senses, as 2 (b), either from, or influenced by, F. prix price. See {Prison}, {Prehensile}, and cf. {Pry}, and also {Price}.] [1913 Webster]

1. That which is taken from another; something captured; a thing seized by force, stratagem, or superior power. [1913 Webster]

I will depart my pris, or my prey, by deliberation. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

His own prize, Whom formerly he had in battle won. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, specifically; (a) (Law) Anything captured by a belligerent using the rights of war; esp., property captured at sea in virtue of the rights of war, as a vessel. --Kent. --Brande & C. (b) An honor or reward striven for in a competitive contest; anything offered to be competed for, or as an inducement to, or reward of, effort. [1913 Webster]

I'll never wrestle for prize more. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

I fought and conquered, yet have lost the prize. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] (c) That which may be won by chance, as in a lottery. [1913 Webster]

3. Anything worth striving for; a valuable possession held or in prospect. [1913 Webster]

I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus. --Phil. iii. 14. [1913 Webster]

4. A contest for a reward; competition. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. A lever; a pry; also, the hold of a lever. [Written also {prise}.] [1913 Webster]

{Prize court}, a court having jurisdiction of all captures made in war on the high seas. --Bouvier.

{Prize fight}, an exhibition contest, esp. one of pugilists, for a stake or wager.

{Prize fighter}, one who fights publicly for a reward; -- applied esp. to a professional boxer or pugilist. --Pope.

{Prize fighting}, fighting, especially boxing, in public for a reward or wager.

{Prize master}, an officer put in charge or command of a captured vessel.

{Prize medal}, a medal given as a prize.

{Prize money}, a dividend from the proceeds of a captured vessel, etc., paid to the captors.

{Prize ring}, the ring or inclosure for a prize fight; the system and practice of prize fighting.

{To make prize of}, to capture. --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • prize court — n. a court that decides how captured property, esp. that taken at sea in wartime, is to be distributed …   English World dictionary

  • Prize court — A prize court is a court (or even a single individual, such as an ambassador or consul) authorized to consider whether or not a ship has been lawfully captured or seized in time of war or under the terms of the seizing ship s letters of marque… …   Wikipedia

  • prize court — a court whose function it is to adjudicate on prizes taken in war. [1785 95, Amer.] * * * ▪ international law       a municipal (national) court in which the legality of captures of goods and vessels at sea and related questions are determined.… …   Universalium

  • prize court — noun 1. : a court having jurisdiction to adjudge upon captures at sea in time of war 2. : a court having jurisdiction over seizures by revenue officers and other officials with similar authority * * * a court whose function it is to adjudicate on …   Useful english dictionary

  • prize court — A court which administers prize law, adjudicating the right to property as prize of war. An anomaly in jurisprudence as a domestic court administering law of the nations. 56 Am J1st War § 182. Having taken goods of the enemy, the captors have a… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • prize court — noun a court adjudicating on the distribution of ships and property captured in naval warfare …   English new terms dictionary

  • International Prize Court — The capturing of prizes (enemy equipment, vehicles, and especially ships) during wartime is a tradition that goes back as far as organized warfare itself.The International Prize Court was an international court proposed at the beginning of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Prize crew — is a term used to indicate a number of crew members of a ship chosen to take over the operations of a captured ship. Early emphasis on prize crews In the early days of sailing and up into the American Civil War, capturing enemy ships was quite… …   Wikipedia

  • Prize (law) — Prize is a term used in admiralty law to refer to equipment, vehicles, and vessels captured during armed conflict. The most common use of prize in this sense is the capture of an enemy ship and its cargo. In the past, it was common that the… …   Wikipedia

  • Prize — (pr[imac]z), n. [F. prise a seizing, hold, grasp, fr. pris, p. p. of prendre to take, L. prendere, prehendere; in some senses, as 2 (b), either from, or influenced by, F. prix price. See {Prison}, {Prehensile}, and cf. {Pry}, and also {Price}.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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