Preponderate
Preponderate Pre*pon"der*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Preponderated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preponderating}.] [L. praeponderatus, p. p. of praeponderare; prae before + ponderare to weigh, fr., pondus, ponderis, a weight. See {Ponder}.] 1. To outweigh; to overpower by weight; to exceed in weight; to overbalance. [1913 Webster]

An inconsiderable weight, by distance from the center of the balance, will preponderate greater magnitudes. --Glanvill. [1913 Webster]

2. To overpower by stronger or moral power. [1913 Webster]

3. To cause to prefer; to incline; to decide. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The desire to spare Christian blood preponderates him for peace. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • preponderate — pre·pon·der·ate /pri pän də ˌrāt/ vi at·ed, at·ing: to have greater credibility or convincing weight: have an outweighing effect the evidence either was evenly balanced or preponderated in favor of the state Weston v. State, 682 P.2d 1119 (1984)… …   Law dictionary

  • Preponderate — Pre*pon der*ate, v. i. To exceed in weight; hence, to incline or descend, as the scale of a balance; figuratively, to exceed in influence, power, etc.; hence; to incline to one side; as, the affirmative side preponderated. [1913 Webster] That is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preponderate — 1620s, to weigh more than, from L. praeponderare outweigh, from prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + ponderare to weigh (see POUND (Cf. pound) (n.1)). Meaning to exceed in force or power is from 1799 …   Etymology dictionary

  • preponderate — ► VERB ▪ be preponderant. ORIGIN Latin praeponderare weigh more …   English terms dictionary

  • preponderate — [prē pän′dər āt΄, pripän′dər āt΄] vi. preponderated, preponderating [< L praeponderatus, pp. of praeponderare < prae , before + ponderare, to weigh < pondus, weight: see POUND1] 1. Now Rare to weigh more; be heavier 2. to sink or incline …   English World dictionary

  • preponderate — I. verb ( ated; ating) Etymology: Latin praeponderatus, past participle of praeponderare, from prae + ponder , pondus weight more at pendant Date: 1623 intransitive verb 1. to exceed in weight 2. to exceed in influence, power, or importance 3 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • preponderate — preponderation, n. /pri pon deuh rayt /, v.i., preponderated, preponderating. 1. to exceed something else in weight; be the heavier. 2. to incline downward or descend, as one scale or end of a balance, because of greater weight; be weighed down.… …   Universalium

  • preponderate — verb a) To outweigh; to overpower by weight; to exceed in weight; to overbalance. b) To overpower by stronger or moral power. See Also: preponder …   Wiktionary

  • preponderate — Synonyms and related words: best, bestride, better, cap, dictate, dominate, domineer, exceed, excel, go one better, have the ascendancy, improve on, master, outweigh, overbalance, overbear, overcome, overpass, overtop, perfect, play first fiddle …   Moby Thesaurus

  • preponderate — I (Roget s IV) v. Syn. excel, outdo, predominate; see exceed , surpass . II (Roget s Thesaurus II) verb To occupy the preeminent position in: dominate, predominate, prevail, reign, rule. Idioms: have the ascendancy, reign supreme. See OVER …   English dictionary for students

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