Predicating
Predicate Pred"i*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Predicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Predicating}.] [L. praedicatus, p. p. of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See {Preach}.] 1. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow. [1913 Webster]

2. To found; to base. [U.S.] [1913 Webster]

Note: Predicate is sometimes used in the United States for found or base; as, to predicate an argument on certain principles; to predicate a statement on information received. Predicate is a term in logic, and used only in a single case, namely, when we affirm one thing of another. ``Similitude is not predicated of essences or substances, but of figures and qualities only.'' --Cudworth. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • predicating — pred·i·cate || predɪkeɪt n. (Grammar) fundamental part of a sentence that contains a verb and provides details about the subject of a sentence (such as attributes, action, etc.) v. base on, found on; establish, set; ascribe, attribute …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Aristotle — /ar euh stot l/, n. 384 322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great. * * * born 384, Stagira died 322 BC, Chalcis Greek philosopher and scientist whose thought determined the course of Western intellectual history… …   Universalium

  • Predicant — Pred i*cant, a. [L. praedicans, antis, p. pr. of praedicare. See {Predicate}.] Predicating; affirming; declaring; proclaiming; hence; preaching. The Roman predicant orders. N. Brit. Rev. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicate — Pred i*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Predicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Predicating}.] [L. praedicatus, p. p. of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See {Preach}.] 1. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicated — Predicate Pred i*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Predicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Predicating}.] [L. praedicatus, p. p. of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See {Preach}.] 1. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predication — Pred i*ca tion, n. [L. praedicatio: cf. F. pr[ e]dication.] 1. The act of predicating, or of affirming one thing of another; affirmation; assertion. Locke. [1913 Webster] 2. Preaching. [Obs. or Scot.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicative — Pred i*ca*tive, a. [L. praedicativus.] Expressing affirmation or predication; affirming; predicating, as, a predicative term. {Pred i*ca*tive*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Predicatively — Predicative Pred i*ca*tive, a. [L. praedicativus.] Expressing affirmation or predication; affirming; predicating, as, a predicative term. {Pred i*ca*tive*ly}, adv. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • predication — noun Etymology: Middle English predicacion, from Anglo French predicaciun, from Latin praedication , praedicatio, from praedicare Date: 14th century 1. archaic a. an act of proclaiming or preaching b. sermon 2. an act or instance of predicating:… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • privative — I. adjective Date: 14th century constituting or predicating privation or absence of a quality < non is a privative prefix > • privatively adverb II. noun Date: 1588 a privative term, expression, or proposition; also a privative prefix or suffix …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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