Predicated
Predicate Pred"i*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Predicated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Predicating}.] [L. praedicatus, p. p. of praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim. See {Preach}.] 1. To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow. [1913 Webster]

2. To found; to base. [U.S.] [1913 Webster]

Note: Predicate is sometimes used in the United States for found or base; as, to predicate an argument on certain principles; to predicate a statement on information received. Predicate is a term in logic, and used only in a single case, namely, when we affirm one thing of another. ``Similitude is not predicated of essences or substances, but of figures and qualities only.'' --Cudworth. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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