Preach
Preach Preach, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Preached}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Preaching}.] [OE. prechen, OF. preechier, F. pr[^e]cher, fr. L. praedicare to cry in public, to proclaim; prae before + dicare to make known, dicere to say; or perhaps from (assumed) LL. praedictare. See {Diction}, and cf. {Predicate}, {Predict}.] 1. To proclaim or publish tidings; specifically, to proclaim the gospel; to discourse publicly on a religious subject, or from a text of Scripture; to deliver a sermon. [1913 Webster]

How shall they preach, except they be sent? --Rom. x. 15. [1913 Webster]

From that time Jesus began to preach. --Matt. iv. 17. [1913 Webster]

2. To give serious advice on morals or religion; to discourse in the manner of a preacher. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • preach — preach·able; preach·er; preach·er·less; preach·er·ly; preach·er·ship; preach·ifi·ca·tion; preach·ify; preach·i·ly; preach·i·ness; preach·ment; un·preach; preach; preach·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • preach — [ pritʃ ] verb * 1. ) intransitive or transitive to talk about a religious subject at a religious meeting, especially in church: preach a sermon: The Reverend Hugh McKeag preached the sermon. preach to: That afternoon he preached to three… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Preach — Preach, v. t. 1. To proclaim by public discourse; to utter in a sermon or a formal religious harangue. [1913 Webster] That Cristes gospel truly wolde preche. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] The Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preach — [pri:tʃ] v [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: prechier, from Late Latin praedicare, from Latin dicare to say publicly ] 1.) [I and T] to talk about a religious subject in a public place, especially in a church during a service preach to ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Preach — Preach, n. [Cf. F. pr[^e]che, fr. pr[^e]cher. See {Preach}, v.] A religious discourse. [Obs.] Hooker. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • preach — (v.) late O.E. predician, a loan word from Church Latin, reborrowed 12c. as preachen, from O.Fr. prechier (11c.), from L.L. predicare to proclaim publicly, announce (in Medieval Latin to preach ), from L. prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + dicare …   Etymology dictionary

  • preach — [v1] speak publicly about beliefs address, deliver, deliver sermon, evangelize, exhort, give sermon, homilize, inform, minister, mission, missionary, orate, prophesy, pulpiteer, sermonize, talk, teach; concepts 51,285,367 preach [v2] lecture,… …   New thesaurus

  • preach — ► VERB 1) deliver a religious address to an assembled group of people. 2) earnestly advocate (a principle). 3) (preach at) give moral advice to (someone) in a self righteous way. DERIVATIVES preacher noun. ORIGIN Old French prechier, from Latin… …   English terms dictionary

  • preach — [prēch] vi. [ME prechen < OFr precher < LL(Ec) praedicare, to preach the gospel < L, to declare in public, admonish < prae , PRE + dicare, to proclaim, akin to dicere, to say: see DICTION] 1. to speak in public on religious matters;… …   English World dictionary

  • preach — index address (talk to), declaim, educate, inculcate, recite Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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