Pot foot
Polt Polt, n. [Cf. E. pelt, L. pultare to beat, strike.] A blow or thump. --Halliwell. -- a. Distorted. [1913 Webster]

{Pot foot}, a distorted foot. --Sir T. Herbert. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • foot|man — «FUT muhn», noun, plural men. 1. a male servant who answers the bell, waits on the table, goes with a carriage or car to open the door, and has similar duties. Footmen usually wear a kind of uniform. 2. Rare. a foot soldier. 3. a stand to support …   Useful english dictionary

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  • The Adventure of the Devil's Foot — by Arthur Conan Doyle Released 1910 Series His Last Bow Client(s) Mortimer Tregennis Set in 1897 Villain(s) Mortimer Tregennis, and arguably, Dr. Leon Sterndale The Adventure of the Devil s Foot is one of the …   Wikipedia

  • 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot — Infobox Military Unit unit name= 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot caption=officer and private of 52nd by J C Stadler, after C H Hamilton, 1800s dates=1755–1881 country=United Kingdom branch=Army type=Line Infantry role=Light Infantry size=One… …   Wikipedia

  • a watched pot never boils — 1848 GASKELL Mary Barton II. xiv. What’s the use of watching? A watched pot never boils. 1880 M. E. BRADDON Cloven Foot III. viii. Don’t you know that vulgar old proverb that says that ‘a watched pot never boils’? 1940 C. BOOTHE Europe in Spring… …   Proverbs new dictionary

  • put one's foot down — {v. phr.}, {informal} To take a decided stand; be stubborn in decision. * /John didn t want to practice his piano lesson, but his teacher put his foot down./ * /When it came to smoking pot at parties, our parents put their foot down./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • put one's foot down — {v. phr.}, {informal} To take a decided stand; be stubborn in decision. * /John didn t want to practice his piano lesson, but his teacher put his foot down./ * /When it came to smoking pot at parties, our parents put their foot down./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • From head to foot — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • put\ one's\ foot\ down — v. phr. informal To take a decided stand; be stubborn in decision. John didn t want to practice his piano lesson, but his teacher put his foot down. When it came to smoking pot at parties, our parents put their foot down …   Словарь американских идиом

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