Port arms
Port Port, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Porting}.] [F. porter, L. portare to carry. See {Port} demeanor.] 1. To carry; to bear; to transport. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

They are easily ported by boat into other shires. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

2. (Mil.) To throw, as a musket, diagonally across the body, with the lock in front, the right hand grasping the small of the stock, and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder; as, to port arms. [1913 Webster]

Began to hem him round with ported spears. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{Port arms}, a position in the manual of arms, executed as above. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • port arms — port′ arms′ n. mil a position in military drill in which one s rifle is held diagonally in front of the body, with the muzzle pointing upward to the left • Etymology: 1795–1805; n. use of the command port arms!; see port V …   From formal English to slang

  • port arms — noun Etymology: from the imperative phrase port, arms : a position in the manual of arms in which the rifle is held diagonally in front of the body so that the barrel is at the left shoulder often used as a command * * * a position in military… …   Useful english dictionary

  • port arms — noun Etymology: from the command port arms! Date: circa 1890 a position in the manual of arms in which the rifle is held diagonally in front of the body with the muzzle pointing upward to the left; also a command to assume this position …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • port arms — a position in military drill in which one s rifle is held diagonally in front of the body, with the muzzle pointing upward to the left. [1795 1805] * * * …   Universalium

  • port arms — verb To carry ones personal firearm diagonally in front of the body …   Wiktionary

  • port arms ! — hold your weapon at your side! …   English contemporary dictionary

  • at port arms — Military in the position adopted when given a command to port one s weapon …   Useful english dictionary

  • Port — Port, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Porting}.] [F. porter, L. portare to carry. See {Port} demeanor.] 1. To carry; to bear; to transport. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] They are easily ported by boat into other shires. Fuller. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • port — I [[t]pɔrt, poʊrt[/t]] n. 1) a city, town, or other place where ships load or unload 2) a place along a coast in which ships may take refuge from storms; harbor 3) law Also called port of entry a) any place where imported goods may be received… …   From formal English to slang

  • port — 1. n. 1 a harbour. 2 a place of refuge. 3 a town or place possessing a harbour, esp. one where customs officers are stationed. Phrases and idioms: port of call a place where a ship or a person stops on a journey. Port of London Authority the… …   Useful english dictionary

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