Pork \Pork\, n. [F. porc, L. porcus hog, pig. See {Farrow} a litter of pigs, and cf. {Porcelain}, {Porpoise}.] The flesh of swine, fresh or salted, used for food. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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  • pork — (n.) early 13c., flesh of a pig as food, from L. porcus pig, tame swine, from PIE *porko young swine (Cf. Umbrian purka; O.C.S. prase young pig; Lith. parsas pig; O.E. fearh, M.Du. varken, both from P.Gmc. *farhaz). Porker …   Etymology dictionary

  • pork — [pôrk] n. [ME porc < OFr < L porcus, a pig < IE * pork̑os, pig > FARROW1] 1. Obs. a pig or hog 2. the flesh of a pig or hog, used as food, esp. when used fresh, or uncured ☆ 3. Informal money, jobs, etc. received as pork barrel …   English World dictionary

  • pork — [po:k US po:rk] n [U] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: porc pig , from Latin porcus] 1.) the meat from pigs ▪ pork chops 2.) AmE informal government money spent in a particular area in order to get political advantages used to show… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • pork — [ pɔrk ] noun uncount * the meat from a pig: Do you eat pork? pork chops ─ compare BACON, HAM …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Pork — Pork, verschnittenes Schwein …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • pork — ► NOUN ▪ the flesh of a pig used as food, especially when uncured. ORIGIN Latin porcus pig …   English terms dictionary

  • Pork — For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). Pork tenderloin served French style …   Wikipedia

  • pork — porkish, porklike, adj. porkless, adj. /pawrk, pohrk/, n. 1. the flesh of hogs used as food. 2. Informal. appropriations, appointments, etc., made by the government for political reasons rather than for public benefit, as for public buildings or… …   Universalium

  • pork — more·pork; pork; pork·bur·ger; pork·chop·per; pork·er; pork·et; pork·ish; pork·ling; …   English syllables

  • pork — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ fresh ▪ roast, salt, smoked ▪ ground, pulled (both AmE) … OF PORK ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

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