Backbond
Backbond Back"bond` (b[a^]k"b[o^]nd`), n. [Back, adv. + bond.] (Scots Law) An instrument which, in conjunction with another making an absolute disposition, constitutes a trust. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • backbond — A bond of indemnification given to a surety …   Black's law dictionary

  • backbond — A bond of indemnification given to a surety …   Black's law dictionary

  • backbond — backˈbond same as ↑backletter below. • • • Main Entry: ↑back …   Useful english dictionary

  • Chemical bond — A chemical bond is an attraction between atoms that allows the formation of chemical substances that contain two or more atoms. The bond is caused by the electromagnetic force attraction between opposite charges, either between electrons and… …   Wikipedia

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  • Metallic bond — Metallic bonding is the electrostatic attractive forces between the delocalized electrons, called conduction electrons, gathered in an electron sea , and the positively charged metal ions. Understood as the sharing of free electrons among a… …   Wikipedia

  • Van der Waals force — In physical chemistry, the van der Waals force (or van der Waals interaction), named after Dutch scientist Johannes Diderik van der Waals, is the sum of the attractive or repulsive forces between molecules (or between parts of the same molecule)… …   Wikipedia

  • Conjugated system — Cinnamaldehyde, a type of phenolic compound with a conjugated system …   Wikipedia

  • Chemical polarity — Polar molecule and Nonpolar redirect here. For other uses see Polar (disambiguation). A water molecule, a commonly used example of polarity. The two charges are present with a negative charge in the middle (red shade), and a positive charge at… …   Wikipedia

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