plunging battery
Plunge Plunge, n. 1. The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, to take the water with a plunge. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed with difficulties. [R.] [1913 Webster]

She was brought to that plunge, to conceal her husband's murder or accuse her son. --Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster]

And with thou not reach out a friendly arm, To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrows? --Addison. [1913 Webster]

3. The act of pitching or throwing one's self headlong or violently forward, like an unruly horse. [1913 Webster]

4. Heavy and reckless betting in horse racing; hazardous speculation. [Cant] [1913 Webster]

{Plunge bath}, an immersion by plunging; also, a large bath in which the bather can wholly immerse himself.

{Plunge battery}, or {plunging battery} (Elec.), a voltaic battery so arranged that the plates can be plunged into, or withdrawn from, the exciting liquid at pleasure. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Plunge battery — Plunge Plunge, n. 1. The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, to take the water with a plunge. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Plunge — Plunge, n. 1. The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, to take the water with a plunge. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Plunge bath — Plunge Plunge, n. 1. The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, to take the water with a plunge. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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