Place name
Place Place (pl[=a]s), n. [F., fr. L. platea a street, an area, a courtyard, from Gr. platei^a a street, properly fem. of platy`s, flat, broad; akin to Skr. p[.r]thu, Lith. platus. Cf. {Flawn}, {Piazza}, {Plate}, {Plaza}.] 1. Any portion of space regarded as measured off or distinct from all other space, or appropriated to some definite object or use; position; ground; site; spot; rarely, unbounded space. [1913 Webster]

Here is the place appointed. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

What place can be for us Within heaven's bound? --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The word place has sometimes a more confused sense, and stands for that space which any body takes up; and so the universe is a place. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. A broad way in a city; an open space; an area; a court or short part of a street open only at one end. ``Hangman boys in the market place.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. A position which is occupied and held; a dwelling; a mansion; a village, town, or city; a fortified town or post; a stronghold; a region or country. [1913 Webster]

Are you native of this place? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. Rank; degree; grade; order of priority, advancement, dignity, or importance; especially, social rank or position; condition; also, official station; occupation; calling. ``The enervating magic of place.'' --Hawthorne. [1913 Webster]

Men in great place are thrice servants. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

I know my place as I would they should do theirs. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. Vacated or relinquished space; room; stead (the departure or removal of another being or thing being implied). ``In place of Lord Bassanio.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. A definite position or passage of a document. [1913 Webster]

The place of the scripture which he read was this. --Acts viii. 32. [1913 Webster]

7. Ordinal relation; position in the order of proceeding; as, he said in the first place. [1913 Webster]

8. Reception; effect; -- implying the making room for. [1913 Webster]

My word hath no place in you. --John viii. 37. [1913 Webster]

9. (Astron.) Position in the heavens, as of a heavenly body; -- usually defined by its right ascension and declination, or by its latitude and longitude. [1913 Webster]

10. (Racing) The position of first, second, or third at the finish, esp. the second position. In betting, to win a bet on a horse for place it must, in the United States, finish first or second, in England, usually, first, second, or third. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

{Place of arms} (Mil.), a place calculated for the rendezvous of men in arms, etc., as a fort which affords a safe retreat for hospitals, magazines, etc. --Wilhelm.

{High place} (Script.), a mount on which sacrifices were offered. ``Him that offereth in the high place.'' --Jer. xlviii. 35.

{In place}, in proper position; timely.

{Out of place}, inappropriate; ill-timed; as, his remarks were out of place.

{Place kick} (Football), the act of kicking the ball after it has been placed on the ground.

{Place name}, the name of a place or locality. --London Academy.

{To give place}, to make room; to yield; to give way; to give advantage. ``Neither give place to the devil.'' --Eph. iv. 27. ``Let all the rest give place.'' --Shak.

{To have place}, to have a station, room, or seat; as, such desires can have no place in a good heart.

{To take place}. (a) To come to pass; to occur; as, the ceremony will not take place. (b) To take precedence or priority. --Addison. (c) To take effect; to prevail. ``If your doctrine takes place.'' --Berkeley. ``But none of these excuses would take place.'' --Spenser.

{To take the place of}, to be substituted for. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Situation; seat; abode; position; locality; location; site; spot; office; employment; charge; function; trust; ground; room; stead. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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