pitch
Dip Dip, n. 1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. ``The dip of oars in unison.'' --Glover. [1913 Webster]

2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch. [1913 Webster]

3. a hollow or depression in a surface, especially in the ground. [PJC]

4. A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon. [Local, U.S.] --Bartlett. [1913 Webster]

5. A dipped candle. [Colloq.] --Marryat. [1913 Webster]

6. A gymnastic exercise on the parallel bars in which the performer, resting on his hands, lets his arms bend and his body sink until his chin is level with the bars, and then raises himself by straightening his arms. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

7. In the turpentine industry, the viscid exudation, which is dipped out from incisions in the trees; as, virgin dip (the runnings of the first year), yellow dip (the runnings of subsequent years). [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

8. (A["e]ronautics) A sudden drop followed by a climb, usually to avoid obstacles or as the result of getting into an airhole. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

9. a liquid, in which objects are soaked by dipping; e.g., a parasiticide or insecticide solution into which animals are dipped (see {sheep-dip}). [PJC]

10. a sauce into which foods are dipped to enhance the flavor; e. g., an {onion dip} made from sour cream and dried onions, into which potato chips are dipped. [PJC]

11. a {pickpocket}. [slang] [PJC]

{Dip of the horizon} (Astron.), the angular depression of the seen or visible horizon below the true or natural horizon; the angle at the eye of an observer between a horizontal line and a tangent drawn from the eye to the surface of the ocean.

{Dip of the needle}, or {Magnetic dip}, the angle formed, in a vertical plane, by a freely suspended magnetic needle, or the line of magnetic force, with a horizontal line; -- called also {inclination}.

{Dip of a stratum} (Geol.), its greatest angle of inclination to the horizon, or that of a line perpendicular to its direction or strike; -- called also the {pitch}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

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  • Pitch — Pitch, n. 1. A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand; as, a good pitch in quoits. [1913 Webster] {Pitch and toss}, a game played by tossing up a coin, and calling Heads or tails; hence: {To play pitch and toss with (anything)}, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pitch — may refer to:In music: * Pitch (music), the property of a sound or musical tone measured by its perceived frequency ** Range (music), the distance from the lowest to the highest pitch a musical instrument can play ** Vocal range, the distance… …   Wikipedia

  • pitch — pitch1 [pich] n. [ME pich < OE pic < L pix (gen. picis) < IE base * pi , to be fat > FAT] 1. a black, sticky substance formed in the distillation of coal tar, wood tar, petroleum, etc. and used for waterproofing, roofing, pavements,… …   English World dictionary

  • Pitch — Pitch, n. [OE. pich, AS. pic, L. pix; akin to Gr. ?.] 1. A thick, black, lustrous, and sticky substance obtained by boiling down tar. It is used in calking the seams of ships; also in coating rope, canvas, wood, ironwork, etc., to preserve them.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pitch — Pitch, v. t. [OE. picchen; akin to E. pick, pike.] 1. To throw, generally with a definite aim or purpose; to cast; to hurl; to toss; as, to pitch quoits; to pitch hay; to pitch a ball. [1913 Webster] 2. To thrust or plant in the ground, as stakes …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pitch — pitch; pitch·blende; pitch·ered; pitch·er·ful; pitch·i·ness; pitch·er; pitch·fork; pitch·man; …   English syllables

  • pitch — Ⅰ. pitch [1] ► NOUN 1) the degree of highness or lowness in a sound or tone, as governed by the rate of vibrations producing it. 2) the steepness of a roof. 3) a particular level of intensity. 4) Brit. an area of ground marked out or used for… …   English terms dictionary

  • Pitch — (englisch: to pitch = werfen, neigen, stimmen; pitch = Tonhöhe, Neigungswinkel) bezeichnet: beim Sport: im Baseball einen Wurf, siehe Pitcher im Cricket einen Teil des Spielfelds, siehe Pitch (Cricket) im Golf einen Schlag, siehe Golfschlag… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Pitch — Pitch, v. i. 1. To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp. Laban with his brethren pitched in the Mount of Gilead. Gen. xxxi. 25. [1913 Webster] 2. To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight. [1913 Webster] The tree whereon… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pitch — [n1] tilt angle, cant, degree, dip, gradient, height, incline, level, point, slant, slope, steepness; concepts 692,738 pitch [n2] tone of sound frequency, harmonic, modulation, rate, sound, timbre; concept 65 pitch [n3] talk to convince patte …   New thesaurus

  • pitch — ● pitch nom masculin (anglais pitch, de to pitch, enfoncer) Au golf, balle restant sur place après l impact. pitch [pitʃ] n. m. ÉTYM. 1934; mot angl. to pitch « ficher, enfoncer ». ❖ ♦ Golf. Balle qui reste à l endroit où elle est tombée sur le… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

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