Ping-pong ball

Ping-pong ball
Ping-pong ball Ping"-pong ball`, v. i. the small hollow celluloid ball used for the game of ping-pong. [PJC]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ping pong ball — noun A lightweight celluloid ball used in the sport of table tennis (ping pong) …   Wiktionary

  • ping-pong ball — noun light hollow ball used in playing table tennis • Hypernyms: ↑ball …   Useful english dictionary

  • Ping-pong — v. i. 1. To play ping pong. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 2. to bounce back and forth, in the manner of a ping pong ball. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ping pong — noun Another name for table tennis. See Also: ping pong ball …   Wiktionary

  • ping-pong fracture — pond fracture a type of depressed skull fracture usually seen in young children, resembling the indentation that can be produced with the finger in a ping pong ball; when elevated it resumes and retains its normal position …   Medical dictionary

  • Ping-Pong™ — ˈping pong (BrE, informal) (NAmE ˈPing Pong™) noun uncountable a game played li …   Useful english dictionary

  • ping-pong — (n.) 1900, as Ping Pong, trademark for table tennis equipment (Parker Brothers). Both words are imitative of the sound of the ball hitting the paddle; from PING (Cf. ping) + pong (attested from 1823). The verb is from 1901; in the figurative… …   Etymology dictionary

  • ping-pong — n. [Imitative.] 1. An indoor modification of lawn tennis played with small bats, or battledores, and a very light, hollow, celluloid ball, on a large table divided across the middle by a net. Also called {table tennis}. [[originally a trade name …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ping-pong — || pɪŋpÉ‘Å‹ / pÉ’Å‹ table tennis, ball game played with a small ball and paddles …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Ping-Pong — n [U] trademark an indoor game played on a table by two people with a small plastic ball and two ↑bats = ↑table tennis …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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