Pinch Pinch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pinched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pinching}.] [F. pincer, probably fr. OD. pitsen to pinch; akin to G. pfetzen to cut, pinch; perhaps of Celtic origin. Cf. {Piece}.] 1. To press hard or squeeze between the ends of the fingers, between teeth or claws, or between the jaws of an instrument; to squeeze or compress, as between any two hard bodies. [1913 Webster]

2. to seize; to grip; to bite; -- said of animals. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

He [the hound] pinched and pulled her down. --Chapman. [1913 Webster]

3. To plait. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Full seemly her wimple ipinched was. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

4. Figuratively: To cramp; to straiten; to oppress; to starve; to distress; as, to be pinched for money. [1913 Webster]

Want of room . . . pinching a whole nation. --Sir W. Raleigh. [1913 Webster]

5. To move, as a railroad car, by prying the wheels with a pinch. See {Pinch}, n., 4. [1913 Webster]

6. To seize by way of theft; to steal; to lift. [Slang] --Robert Barr. [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

7. to catch; to arrest (a criminal). [Webster 1913 Suppl.]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pinch — may refer to:* Pinch (cooking), a very small amount of an ingredient, typically salt or a spice * Pinch, West VirginiaMathematics and Science* Pinch (plasma physics), the compression of a plasma filament by magnetic forces, or a device which uses …   Wikipedia

  • Pinch — Pinch, n. 1. A close compression, as with the ends of the fingers, or with an instrument; a nip. [1913 Webster] 2. As much as may be taken between the finger and thumb; any very small quantity; as, a pinch of snuff. [1913 Webster] 3. Pian; pang.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pinch — [n1] tight pressing compression, confinement, contraction, cramp, grasp, grasping, hurt, limitation, nip, nipping, pressure, squeeze, torment, tweak, twinge; concept 728 pinch [n2] small amount bit, dash, drop, jot, mite, small quantity, soupçon …   New thesaurus

  • pinch — pinch; pinch·able; pinch·er; pinch·beck; pinch·ing; pinch·ing·ly; …   English syllables

  • pinch — ► VERB 1) grip (the flesh) tightly between finger and thumb. 2) (of a shoe) hurt (a foot) by being too tight. 3) tighten (the lips or a part of the face). 4) informal, chiefly Brit. steal. 5) informal arrest. 6) live in a frugal way …   English terms dictionary

  • pinch — [pinch] vt. [ME pinchen < NormFr * pincher < OFr pincier < VL * pinctiare < ? punctiare, to prick (see PUNCHEON1), infl. by * piccare: see PICADOR] 1. to squeeze between a finger and the thumb or between two surfaces, edges, etc. 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • Pinch — Pinch, v. i. 1. To act with pressing force; to compress; to squeeze; as, the shoe pinches. [1913 Webster] 2. (Hunt.) To take hold; to grip, as a dog does. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 3. To spare; to be niggardly; to be covetous. Gower. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pinch — Pinch, WV U.S. Census Designated Place in West Virginia Population (2000): 2811 Housing Units (2000): 1194 Land area (2000): 3.507567 sq. miles (9.084557 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.037141 sq. miles (0.096194 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.544708… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • pinch —    , pinch pot    Pinching is a pottery technique, fundamental to manipulating clay. Making a pinch pot is pressing the thumb into a ball of clay, and drawing the clay out into a pot by repeatedly squeezing the clay between the thumb and fingers …   Glossary of Art Terms

  • pinch — The idiom at a pinch, meaning ‘if absolutely necessary’, is the BrE form; in AmE it has the form in a pinch …   Modern English usage

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