Awayward
Awayward \A*way"ward\ ([.a]*w[=a]"w[~e]rd), adv. Turned away; away. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • awayward — adv. RG. 151 …   Oldest English Words

  • awayward — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Wry — Wry, v. i. 1. To twist; to writhe; to bend or wind. [1913 Webster] 2. To deviate from the right way; to go away or astray; to turn side; to swerve. [1913 Webster] This Phebus gan awayward for to wryen. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] How many Must murder …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wayward — adjective Etymology: Middle English, short for awayward turned away, from away, adverb + ward Date: 14th century 1. following one s own capricious, wanton, or depraved inclinations ; ungovernable < a wayward child > 2. following no clear… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • wayward — waywardly, adv. waywardness, n. /way weuhrd/, adj. 1. turned or turning away from what is right or proper; willful; disobedient: a wayward son; wayward behavior. 2. swayed or prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse; to be wayward in… …   Universalium

  • wayward — way|ward [ˈweıwəd US wərd] adj [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: awayward turned away (13 16 centuries), from away + ward] behaving badly, in a way that is difficult to control ▪ a wayward teenager >waywardness n [U] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • wayward — adjective self willed and unpredictable. Derivatives waywardly adverb waywardness noun Origin ME: shortening of obs. awayward turned away …   English new terms dictionary

  • wayward — way•ward [[t]ˈweɪ wərd[/t]] adj. 1) disregarding or rejecting what is right or proper; willful; disobedient 2) prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse[/ex] 3) changing unpredictably; erratic: a wayward breeze[/ex] • Etymology:… …   From formal English to slang

  • wayward — /ˈweɪwəd / (say waywuhd) adjective 1. turned or turning away from what is right or proper; perverse: a wayward son. 2. swayed or prompted by caprice, or capricious: a wayward fancy; a wayward impulse. 3. turning or changing irregularly; irregular …   Australian English dictionary

  • wayward — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ self willed and unpredictable; perverse. DERIVATIVES waywardly adverb waywardness noun. ORIGIN shortening of obsolete awayward «turned away» …   English terms dictionary

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