Perjuring
Perjure Per"jure, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Perjured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Perjuring}.] [F. parjurer, L. perjurare, perjerare; per through, over + jurare to swear. See {Jury}.] 1. To cause to violate an oath or a vow; to cause to make oath knowingly to what is untrue; to make guilty of perjury; to forswear; to corrupt; -- often used reflexively; as, he perjured himself. [1913 Webster]

Want will perjure The ne'er-touched vestal. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To make a false oath to; to deceive by oaths and protestations. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

And with a virgin innocence did pray For me, that perjured her. --J. Fletcher. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To {Perjure}, {Forswear}.

Usage: These words have been used interchangeably; but there is a tendency to restrict perjure to that species of forswearing which constitutes the crime of perjury at law, namely, the willful violation of an oath administered by a magistrate or according to law. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • perjuring — per·jure || pÉœrdÊ’É™ / pɜː v. lie under oath, provide false testimony …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Perjure — Per jure, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Perjured}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Perjuring}.] [F. parjurer, L. perjurare, perjerare; per through, over + jurare to swear. See {Jury}.] 1. To cause to violate an oath or a vow; to cause to make oath knowingly to what is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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