Pentice
Pentice Pen"tice, n. [F. appentis a penthouse. See {Append}.] A penthouse. [Obs.] --Sir H. Wotton. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • pentice — ˈpentə̇s archaic variant of penthouse * * * pentice earlier form of penthouse …   Useful english dictionary

  • pentice — noun a) An extension of a buildings roof and the protected area beneath. b) A covered walkway …   Wiktionary

  • Pentice — A first floor extension, or projection, on the houses of the better off, creating an extra room. Usually, they were supported by wooden columns or pillars. Cf. Penthouse …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Pentice — 1) Lean to building or covered passage or gallery. (Wood, Margaret. The English Medieval House, 413) 2) A covered way with open sides to enable people to walk between separate buildings in the dry when it is raining. (Beresford, Maurice and Hurst …   Medieval glossary

  • pentice — pen·tice …   English syllables

  • Folk etymology — This article is about a technical term in linguistics. For incorrect popular etymologies, see false etymology. Folk etymology is change in a word or phrase over time resulting from the replacement of an unfamiliar form by a more familiar… …   Wikipedia

  • penthouse — penthouselike, adj. /pent hows /, n., pl. penthouses / how ziz/. 1. an apartment or dwelling on the roof of a building, usually set back from the outer walls. 2. any specially designed apartment on an upper floor, esp. the top floor, of a… …   Universalium

  • Pendice — Pen dice, n. [Cf. {Pentice}.] A sloping roof; a lean to; a penthouse. [Obs.] Fairfax. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Penthouse — Pent house , n. [A corruption of pentice.] A shed or roof sloping from the main wall or building, as over a door or window; a lean to. Also figuratively. The penthouse of his eyes. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stave church — A stave church is a medieval wooden church with a post and beam construction related to timber framing. The wall frames are filled with vertical planks. The load bearing posts ( stafr in Old Norse) have lent their name to the building technique.… …   Wikipedia

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