Averse
Averse A*verse", a. [L. aversus, p. p. of avertere. See {Avert}.] 1. Turned away or backward. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The tracks averse a lying notice gave, And led the searcher backward from the cave. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. Having a repugnance or opposition of mind; disliking; disinclined; unwilling; reluctant. [1913 Webster]

Averse alike to flatter, or offend. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Men who were averse to the life of camps. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Pass by securely as men averse from war. --Micah ii. 8. [1913 Webster]

Note: The prevailing usage now is to employ to after averse and its derivatives rather than from, as was formerly the usage. In this the word is in agreement with its kindred terms, hatred, dislike, dissimilar, contrary, repugnant, etc., expressing a relation or an affection of the mind to an object. [1913 Webster]

Syn: {Averse}, {Reluctant}, {Adverse}.

Usage: Averse expresses an habitual, though not of necessity a very strong, dislike; as, averse to active pursuits; averse to study. Reluctant, a term of the of the will, implies an internal struggle as to making some sacrifice of interest or feeling; as, reluctant to yield; reluctant to make the necessary arrangements; a reluctant will or consent. Adverse denotes active opposition or hostility; as, adverse interests; adverse feelings, plans, or movements; the adverse party. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • averse — [ avɛrs ] n. f. • 1688 averse d eau; de pleuvoir à la verse (1642) → verse ♦ Pluie soudaine et abondante. ⇒ grain, ondée; fam. douche, sauce, saucée; région. drache. Essuyer, recevoir une averse. Averse orageuse. Averse de printemps. ⇒ giboulée.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • averse — averse·ly; averse·ness; averse; …   English syllables

  • averse — ► ADJECTIVE (averse to) ▪ strongly disliking or opposed to. USAGE On the confusion of averse and adverse, see ADVERSE(Cf. ↑adversely). ORIGIN from Latin avertere (see AVERT(Cf. ↑ …   English terms dictionary

  • averse — AVERSE. sub. fém. Pluie subite et abondante. Nous essuyâmes unc averse. Il est familier. ⁶erse. Voy. Verse …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • Averse — A*verse , v. t. & i. To turn away. [Obs.] B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • averse — I adjective adverse, alienus, antagonistic, antipathetic, aversus, disinclined, disliking, hostile, indisposed, inimical, loath, opposed, reluctant, repelled, repugnant, revolted, undesirous, unfavorable, unwilling II index antipathetic …   Law dictionary

  • averse — (adj.) mid 15c., turned away in mind or feeling, from O.Fr. avers and directly from L. aversus turned away, turned back, pp. of avertere (see AVERT (Cf. avert)). Originally and usually in English in the mental sense, while avert is used in a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • averse — 1 *disinclined, indisposed, loath, reluctant, hesitant Analogous words: recoiling, shrinking, flinching, quailing (see RECOIL vb): uncongenial, unsympathetic (see INCONSONANT): balky, *contrary, perverse Antonyms: avid (of or for): athirst (for) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • averse — [adj] opposing afraid, allergic, antagonistic, antipathetic, contrary, disinclined, disliking, having no use for*, hesitant, hostile, ill disposed, indisposed, inimical, loath, nasty, perverse, reluctant, uneager, unfavorable, unfriendly,… …   New thesaurus

  • averse — Averse. Façon de parler adv. qui n est en usage qu en cette phrase. Il pleut à verse, pour dire, Il pleut abondamment …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

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