Pay Pay, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Paid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Paying}.] [OE. paien, F. payer, fr. L. pacare to pacify, appease, fr. pax, pacis, peace. See {Peace}.] 1. To satisfy, or content; specifically, to satisfy (another person) for service rendered, property delivered, etc.; to discharge one's obligation to; to make due return to; to compensate; to remunerate; to recompense; to requite; as, to pay workmen or servants. [1913 Webster]

May no penny ale them pay [i. e., satisfy]. --P. Plowman. [1913 Webster]

[She] pays me with disdain. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, figuratively: To compensate justly; to requite according to merit; to reward; to punish; to retort or retaliate upon. [1913 Webster]

For which, or pay me quickly, or I'll pay you. --B. Jonson. [1913 Webster]

3. To discharge, as a debt, demand, or obligation, by giving or doing what is due or required; to deliver the amount or value of to the person to whom it is owing; to discharge a debt by delivering (money owed). ``Pay me that thou owest.'' --Matt. xviii. 28. [1913 Webster]

Have patience with me, and I will pay thee all. --Matt. xviii. 26. [1913 Webster]

If they pay this tax, they starve. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

4. To discharge or fulfill, as a duy; to perform or render duty, as that which has been promised. [1913 Webster]

This day have I paid my vows. --Prov. vii. 14. [1913 Webster]

5. To give or offer, without an implied obligation; as, to pay attention; to pay a visit. [1913 Webster]

Not paying me a welcome. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To pay off}. (a) To make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship. (b) To allow (a thread, cord, etc.) to run off; to unwind.

{To pay one's duty}, to render homage, as to a sovereign or other superior.

{To pay out} (Naut.), to pass out; hence, to slacken; to allow to run out; as, to pay out more cable. See under {Cable}.

{To pay the piper}, to bear the cost, expense, or trouble. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


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