Pass Pass, v. t. 1. In simple, transitive senses; as: (a) To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc. (b) Hence: To go from one limit to the other of; to spend; to live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer. ``To pass commodiously this life.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

She loved me for the dangers I had passed. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (c) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard. [1913 Webster]

Please you that I may pass This doing. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] (d) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed. [1913 Webster]

And strive to pass . . . Their native music by her skillful art. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Whose tender power Passes the strength of storms in their most desolate hour. --Byron. [1913 Webster] (e) To go successfully through, as an examination, trail, test, etc.; to obtain the formal sanction of, as a legislative body; as, he passed his examination; the bill passed the senate. [1913 Webster]

2. In causative senses: as: (a) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over; as, the waiter passed bisquit and cheese; the torch was passed from hand to hand. [1913 Webster]

I had only time to pass my eye over the medals. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

Waller passed over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster] (b) To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge; as, to pass sentence. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Father, thy word is passed. --Milton. [1913 Webster] (c) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just; as, he passed the bill through the committee; the senate passed the law. (e) To put in circulation; to give currency to; as, to pass counterfeit money. ``Pass the happy news.'' --Tennyson. (f) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance; as, to pass a person into a theater, or over a railroad. [1913 Webster]

3. To emit from the bowels; to evacuate. [1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure. [1913 Webster]

5. (Fencing) To make, as a thrust, punto, etc. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Passed midshipman}. See under Midshipman.

{To pass a dividend}, to omit the declaration and payment of a dividend at the time when due.

{To pass away}, to spend; to waste. ``Lest she pass away the flower of her age.'' --Ecclus. xlii. 9.

{To pass by}. (a) To disregard; to neglect. (b) To excuse; to spare; to overlook.

{To pass off}, to impose fraudulently; to palm off. ``Passed himself off as a bishop.'' --Macaulay.

{To pass (something) on (some one)} or {To pass (something) upon (some one)}, to put upon as a trick or cheat; to palm off. ``She passed the child on her husband for a boy.'' --Dryden.

{To pass over}, to overlook; not to note or resent; as, to pass over an affront. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pass — Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • PASS — vi 1 a: to issue a decision, verdict, or opinion the Supreme Court pass ed on a statute b: to be legally issued judgment pass ed by default 2: to go from the control, ownership, or possession of one person or group to that of …   Law dictionary

  • pass — Ⅰ. pass [1] ► VERB 1) move or go onward, past, through, or across. 2) change from one state or condition to another. 3) transfer (something) to someone. 4) kick, hit, or throw (the ball) to a teammate. 5) (of time) go by. 6) …   English terms dictionary

  • pass — [n1] opening through solid canyon, cut, gap, gorge, passage, passageway, path, ravine; concepts 509,513 Ant. closing, closure pass [n2] authorization, permission admission, chit*, comp, free ride*, furlough, identification, license, order, paper …   New thesaurus

  • pass — pass1 [pas, päs] n. [ME pas: see PACE1] a narrow passage or opening, esp. between mountains; gap; defile pass2 [pas, päs] vi. [ME passen < OFr passer < VL * passare < L passus, a step: see PACE1] 1. to go o …   English World dictionary

  • Pass — Pass, n. [Cf. F. pas (for sense 1), and passe, fr. passer to pass. See {Pass}, v. i.] 1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass — (von französisch passer „überschreiten“) bezeichnet: Reisepass, einen amtlichen Identitätsausweis zur Legitimation bei Auslandsreisen Pass (Sport), das gezielte Übergeben des Sportgerätes im Sport eine Schaltung, um bestimmte Signalanteile… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • PASS — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom …   Wikipédia en Français

  • pass# — pass vb Pass, pass away, elapse, expire mean to move or come to a termination or end. Pass and pass away imply gradual or gentle movement to another state or condition; they often imply a transition from life to death but they may suggest a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Pass — »amtliches Dokument, das der Legitimation (im Ausland) dient; Übergang über einen Gebirgskamm, enger Durchgang; Zuspiel, Vorlage (im Ballspiel); Passgang, Gangart von Vierbeinern«; Quelle dieses Wortes ist letztlich lat. passus »Schritt«… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”