Particular theorem
Theorem The"o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th['e]or[`e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913 Webster]

Not theories, but theorems (?), the intelligible products of contemplation, intellectual objects in the mind, and of and for the mind exclusively. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster]

By the theorems, Which your polite and terser gallants practice, I re-refine the court, and civilize Their barbarous natures. --Massinger. [1913 Webster]

2. (Math.) A statement of a principle to be demonstrated. [1913 Webster]

Note: A theorem is something to be proved, and is thus distinguished from a problem, which is something to be solved. In analysis, the term is sometimes applied to a rule, especially a rule or statement of relations expressed in a formula or by symbols; as, the binomial theorem; Taylor's theorem. See the Note under {Proposition}, n., 5. [1913 Webster]

{Binomial theorem}. (Math.) See under {Binomial}.

{Negative theorem}, a theorem which expresses the impossibility of any assertion.

{Particular theorem} (Math.), a theorem which extends only to a particular quantity.

{Theorem of Pappus}. (Math.) See {Centrobaric method}, under {Centrobaric}.

{Universal theorem} (Math.), a theorem which extends to any quantity without restriction. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Theorem — The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Theorem of Pappus — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Theorem — The Pythagorean theorem has at least 370 known proofs[1] In mathematics, a theorem is a statement that has been proven on the basis of previously established statements, such as other theorems, and previously accepted statements …   Wikipedia

  • Theorem, Bayes — A probability principle set forth by the English mathematician Thomas Bayes (1702 1761). Bayes theorem is of value in medical decision making and some of the biomedical sciences. Bayes theorem is employed in clinical epidemiology to determine the …   Medical dictionary

  • Binomial theorem — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Negative theorem — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Universal theorem — Theorem The o*rem, n. [L. theorema, Gr. ? a sight, speculation, theory, theorem, fr. ? to look at, ? a spectator: cf. F. th[ e]or[ e]me. See {Theory}.] 1. That which is considered and established as a principle; hence, sometimes, a rule. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Coase theorem — In law and economics, the Coase theorem (pronounced /ˈkoʊs/), attributed to Ronald Coase, describes the economic efficiency of an economic allocation or outcome in the presence of externalities. The theorem states that if trade in an externality… …   Wikipedia

  • Automated theorem proving — (ATP) or automated deduction, currently the most well developed subfield of automated reasoning (AR), is the proving of mathematical theorems by a computer program. Decidability of the problem Depending on the underlying logic, the problem of… …   Wikipedia

  • Infinite monkey theorem — Not to be confused with Hundredth monkey effect. Given enough time, a hypothetical monkey typing at random would, as part of its output, almost surely produce all of Shakespeare s plays. In this image a chimpanzee is giving it a try. The infinite …   Wikipedia

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