Papejay
Papejay Pa"pe*jay, n. A popinjay. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • papejay — sb. == parrot. Wright’s L. P. p. 26. Fr. papegai …   Oldest English Words

  • Popinjay — Pop in*jay, n. [OE. popingay, papejay, OF. papegai, papegaut; cf. Pr. papagai, Sp. & Pg. papagayo, It. pappagallo, LGr. ?, NGr. ?; in which the first syllables are perhaps imitative of the bird s chatter, and the last either fr. L. gallus cock,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • popinjay — noun Etymology: Middle English papejay parrot, from Middle French papegai, papejai, from Arabic babghā Date: 1596 a strutting supercilious person …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • popinjay — /pop in jay /, n. 1. a person given to vain, pretentious displays and empty chatter; coxcomb; fop. 2. Brit. Dial. a woodpecker, esp. the green woodpecker. 3. Archaic. the figure of a parrot usually fixed on a pole and used as a target in archery… …   Universalium

  • Pobjay — This interesting and very unusual surname is of early medieval English origin, and is an example of that sizeable group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames. These nicknames were given with… …   Surnames reference

  • Pobjoy — This interesting and very unusual surname is of early medieval English origin, and is an example of that sizeable group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames. These nicknames were given with… …   Surnames reference

  • popinjay — pop•in•jay [[t]ˈpɒp ɪnˌdʒeɪ[/t]] n. a vain, pretentious person • Etymology: 1275–1325; ME papejay, popingay parrot …   From formal English to slang

  • popinjay — /ˈpɒpəndʒeɪ/ (say popuhnjay) noun 1. a vain, chattering person; a coxcomb; a fop. 2. a figure of a parrot formerly used as a target. 3. a woodpecker, especially the green woodpecker, Picus viridis, of Europe. 4. Obsolete a parrot. {Middle English …   Australian English dictionary

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