Palm Palm, n. [AS. palm, L. palma; -- so named fr. the leaf resembling a hand. See 1st {Palm}, and cf. {Pam}.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Bot.) Any endogenous tree of the order {Palm[ae]} or {Palmace[ae]}; a palm tree. [1913 Webster]

Note: Palms are perennial woody plants, often of majestic size. The trunk is usually erect and rarely branched, and has a roughened exterior composed of the persistent bases of the leaf stalks. The leaves are borne in a terminal crown, and are supported on stout, sheathing, often prickly, petioles. They are usually of great size, and are either pinnately or palmately many-cleft. There are about one thousand species known, nearly all of them growing in tropical or semitropical regions. The wood, petioles, leaves, sap, and fruit of many species are invaluable in the arts and in domestic economy. Among the best known are the date palm, the cocoa palm, the fan palm, the oil palm, the wax palm, the palmyra, and the various kinds called cabbage palm and palmetto. [1913 Webster]

2. A branch or leaf of the palm, anciently borne or worn as a symbol of victory or rejoicing. [1913 Webster]

A great multitude . . . stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palme in their hands. --Rev. vii. 9. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence: Any symbol or token of superiority, success, or triumph; also, victory; triumph; supremacy. ``The palm of martyrdom.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

So get the start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Molucca palm} (Bot.), a labiate herb from Asia ({Molucella l[ae]vis}), having a curious cup-shaped calyx.

{Palm cabbage}, the terminal bud of a cabbage palm, used as food.

{Palm cat} (Zo["o]l.), the common paradoxure.

{Palm crab} (Zo["o]l.), the purse crab.

{Palm oil}, a vegetable oil, obtained from the fruit of several species of palms, as the African oil palm ({El[ae]is Guineensis}), and used in the manufacture of soap and candles. See {El[ae]is}.

{Palm swift} (Zo["o]l.), a small swift ({Cypselus Batassiensis}) which frequents the palmyra and cocoanut palms in India. Its peculiar nest is attached to the leaf of the palmyra palm.

{Palm toddy}. Same as {Palm wine}.

{Palm weevil} (Zo["o]l.), any one of mumerous species of very large weevils of the genus {Rhynchophorus}. The larv[ae] bore into palm trees, and are called {palm borers}, and {grugru worms}. They are considered excellent food.

{Palm wine}, the sap of several species of palms, especially, in India, of the wild date palm ({Ph[oe]nix sylvestrix}), the palmyra, and the {Caryota urens}. When fermented it yields by distillation arrack, and by evaporation jaggery. Called also {palm toddy}.

{Palm worm}, or {Palmworm}. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of a palm weevil. (b) A centipede. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Palm — (engl. für ‚Handfläche‘ oder ‚Palme‘) bezeichnet: eine englische Längeneinheit von der Breite der Handfläche, siehe Angloamerikanisches Maßsystem #Sonstige Längenmaße verschiedene Modelle von Kleinstcomputern mit berührungsempfidlichen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Palm — Palm(s) may refer to: * The central region of the front of the hand * Various plants: ** Palm tree or Arecaceae, a family of flowering plants belonging to the monocot order Arecales ** Traveler s palm or Ravenala madagascariensis , a species of… …   Wikipedia

  • PALM — (Heb. תָּמָר, mishnaic Heb. דֶּקֶל), the Phoenix dactylifera. In the Bible the word tamar refers only to the tree; it refers to the fruit also only in rabbinic literature. According to rabbinic tradition, the honey enumerated among the seven… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • palm — palm1 [päm] n. [ME palme < OE palm < L palma: so named because its leaf somewhat resembles the palm of the hand] 1. any of an order (Arecales) of tropical or subtropical monocotyledonous trees and shrubs, having a woody, usually unbranched …   English World dictionary

  • palm — Ⅰ. palm [1] ► NOUN 1) (also palm tree) an evergreen tree with a crown of very long feathered or fan shaped leaves, growing in warm regions. 2) a leaf of a palm awarded as a prize or viewed as a symbol of victory. ORIGIN Latin palma palm (of a… …   English terms dictionary

  • Palm — Palm: В Викисловаре есть статья «palm» Palm (компания)  американская компания, производившая продукты семейства Palm, затем КПМ и смартфоны на основе Palm OS …   Википедия

  • palm — (p[aum]m), n. [OE. paume, F. paume, L. palma, Gr. pala mh, akin to Skr. p[=a][.n]i hand, and E. fumble. See {Fumble}, {Feel}, and cf. 2d {Palm}.] 1. (Anat.) The inner and somewhat concave part of the hand between the bases of the fingers and the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Palm — (p[aum]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Palmed} (p[aum]md); p. pr. & vb. n. {Palming}.] 1. To handle. [Obs.] Prior. [1913 Webster] 2. To manipulate with, or conceal in, the palm of the hand; to juggle. [1913 Webster] They palmed the trick that lost the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • palm — the tree [OE] and the palm of the hand [14] are effectively distinct words in English, but they have the same ultimate source: Latin palma. This originally meant ‘palm of the hand’ (it is related to Irish lám ‘hand’ and Welsh llaw ‘hand’), and… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • palm — the tree [OE] and the palm of the hand [14] are effectively distinct words in English, but they have the same ultimate source: Latin palma. This originally meant ‘palm of the hand’ (it is related to Irish lám ‘hand’ and Welsh llaw ‘hand’), and… …   Word origins

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