palm
palm palm (p[aum]m), n. [OE. paume, F. paume, L. palma, Gr. pala`mh, akin to Skr. p[=a][.n]i hand, and E. fumble. See {Fumble}, {Feel}, and cf. 2d {Palm}.] 1. (Anat.) The inner and somewhat concave part of the hand between the bases of the fingers and the wrist. [1913 Webster]

Clench'd her fingers till they bit the palm. --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

2. A lineal measure equal either to the breadth of the hand or to its length from the wrist to the ends of the fingers; a hand; -- used in measuring a horse's height. [1913 Webster]

Note: In Greece, the palm was reckoned at three inches. The Romans adopted two measures of this name, the lesser palm of 2.91 inches, and the greater palm of 8.73 inches. At the present day, this measure varies in the most arbitrary manner, being different in each country, and occasionally varying in the same. --Internat. Cyc. [1913 Webster]

3. (Sailmaking) A metallic disk, attached to a strap, and worn on the palm of the hand, -- used to push the needle through the canvas, in sewing sails, etc. [1913 Webster]

4. (Zo["o]l.) The broad flattened part of an antler, as of a full-grown fallow deer; -- so called as resembling the palm of the hand with its protruding fingers. [1913 Webster]

5. (Naut.) The flat inner face of an anchor fluke. [1913 Webster]

{to grease the palm of}, v. t. To bribe or tip. [Slang] [Webster 1913 Suppl.]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Palm — (engl. für ‚Handfläche‘ oder ‚Palme‘) bezeichnet: eine englische Längeneinheit von der Breite der Handfläche, siehe Angloamerikanisches Maßsystem #Sonstige Längenmaße verschiedene Modelle von Kleinstcomputern mit berührungsempfidlichen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Palm — Palm, n. [AS. palm, L. palma; so named fr. the leaf resembling a hand. See 1st {Palm}, and cf. {Pam}.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Bot.) Any endogenous tree of the order {Palm[ae]} or {Palmace[ae]}; a palm tree. [1913 Webster] Note: Palms are perennial… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Palm — Palm(s) may refer to: * The central region of the front of the hand * Various plants: ** Palm tree or Arecaceae, a family of flowering plants belonging to the monocot order Arecales ** Traveler s palm or Ravenala madagascariensis , a species of… …   Wikipedia

  • PALM — (Heb. תָּמָר, mishnaic Heb. דֶּקֶל), the Phoenix dactylifera. In the Bible the word tamar refers only to the tree; it refers to the fruit also only in rabbinic literature. According to rabbinic tradition, the honey enumerated among the seven… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • palm — palm1 [päm] n. [ME palme < OE palm < L palma: so named because its leaf somewhat resembles the palm of the hand] 1. any of an order (Arecales) of tropical or subtropical monocotyledonous trees and shrubs, having a woody, usually unbranched …   English World dictionary

  • palm — Ⅰ. palm [1] ► NOUN 1) (also palm tree) an evergreen tree with a crown of very long feathered or fan shaped leaves, growing in warm regions. 2) a leaf of a palm awarded as a prize or viewed as a symbol of victory. ORIGIN Latin palma palm (of a… …   English terms dictionary

  • Palm — Palm: В Викисловаре есть статья «palm» Palm (компания)  американская компания, производившая продукты семейства Palm, затем КПМ и смартфоны на основе Palm OS …   Википедия

  • Palm — (p[aum]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Palmed} (p[aum]md); p. pr. & vb. n. {Palming}.] 1. To handle. [Obs.] Prior. [1913 Webster] 2. To manipulate with, or conceal in, the palm of the hand; to juggle. [1913 Webster] They palmed the trick that lost the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • palm — the tree [OE] and the palm of the hand [14] are effectively distinct words in English, but they have the same ultimate source: Latin palma. This originally meant ‘palm of the hand’ (it is related to Irish lám ‘hand’ and Welsh llaw ‘hand’), and… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • palm — the tree [OE] and the palm of the hand [14] are effectively distinct words in English, but they have the same ultimate source: Latin palma. This originally meant ‘palm of the hand’ (it is related to Irish lám ‘hand’ and Welsh llaw ‘hand’), and… …   Word origins

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