Accoast
Accoast Ac*coast" ([a^]k*k[=o]st"), v. t. & i. [See {Accost}, {Coast}.] To lie or sail along the coast or side of; to accost. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Whether high towering or accoasting low. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • accoast — Etymology: Middle French accoster more at accost obsolete variant of accost * * * accoast, v., accoasting, vbl. n. The older forms of accost, accosting, while they retained the sense of to coast, border upon, or …   Useful english dictionary

  • Accost — Ac*cost (#; 115), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accosted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accosting}.] [F. accoster, LL. accostare to bring side by side; L. ad + costa rib, side. See {Coast}, and cf. {Accoast}.] 1. To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail along… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Accosted — Accost Ac*cost (#; 115), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accosted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accosting}.] [F. accoster, LL. accostare to bring side by side; L. ad + costa rib, side. See {Coast}, and cf. {Accoast}.] 1. To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Accosting — Accost Ac*cost (#; 115), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accosted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Accosting}.] [F. accoster, LL. accostare to bring side by side; L. ad + costa rib, side. See {Coast}, and cf. {Accoast}.] 1. To join side to side; to border; hence, to sail …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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