Overstayed
Overstay O`ver*stay", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Overstayed}or {Overstaid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Overstaying}.] To stay beyond the time or the limits of; as, to overstay the appointed time; to overstay one's welcome. --Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • overstayed — v. stay too long, outstay welcome …   English contemporary dictionary

  • overstayed — …   Useful english dictionary

  • overstay — UK [ˌəʊvə(r)ˈsteɪ] / US [ˌoʊvərˈsteɪ] verb [transitive] Word forms overstay : present tense I/you/we/they overstay he/she/it overstays present participle overstaying past tense overstayed past participle overstayed to stay in a place longer than… …   English dictionary

  • Native American civil rights — are the civil rights of Native Americans in the United States. Although indigenous to the Americas, American Indians became one of many minorities and the movement for American Indian civil rights began almost as soon as Europeans started to… …   Wikipedia

  • overstay — [[t]o͟ʊvə(r)ste͟ɪ[/t]] overstays, overstaying, overstayed VERB: no passive If you overstay your time, you stay somewhere for longer than you should. to overstay your welcome → see welcome [V n] Up to forty per …   English dictionary

  • Overstaid — Overstay O ver*stay , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Overstayed}or {Overstaid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Overstaying}.] To stay beyond the time or the limits of; as, to overstay the appointed time; to overstay one s welcome. Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Overstay — O ver*stay , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Overstayed}or {Overstaid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Overstaying}.] To stay beyond the time or the limits of; as, to overstay the appointed time; to overstay one s welcome. Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Overstaying — Overstay O ver*stay , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Overstayed}or {Overstaid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Overstaying}.] To stay beyond the time or the limits of; as, to overstay the appointed time; to overstay one s welcome. Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • welcome — I. transitive verb (welcomed; welcoming) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English welcumian, wylcumian, from wilcuma, noun Date: before 12th century 1. to greet hospitably and with courtesy or cordiality 2. to accept with pleasure the… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • British Columbia — Colombie Britannique (French) …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”